Proteomic study of renal uric acid stone

Yeong Chin Jou, Chiung Yao Fang, Syue Yi Chen, Fang Hung Chen, Ming Chin Cheng, Cheng Huang Shen, Li Wen Liao, Yuh-Shyan Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To analyze urinary uric acid stone matrix proteins (SMP) with mass spectrometry (MS) to evaluate the mechanisms of uric acid stone formation. SMP plays an important role in urinary stone formation. Several proteomic studies apply to calcium-containing stones have been reported; however no proteomic study for urinary uric acid stone has been reported. Methods: Pure kidney uric acid stones from 5 individuals were demineralized, and SMPs were isolated. The obtained proteins were analyzed with reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem MS. The acquired data were searched against a Swiss Prot human protein database using Matrix Science, Mascot. The identified proteins were submitted to the AmiGO Web site for gene ontology analysis. They were also sumitted to Metacore software and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes website (KEGG) for pathway analysis. MS-determined protein expressions were verified by immunoblot. Results: MS analysis identified 242 proteins from 5 proteomic results and the number of the identified protein of each result ranged from 52 to 156. Metacore software analysis suggested that inflammation may play an important role for kidney uric acid stone formation. Endogenous metabolic pathways were also analyzed and submitted to KEGG Web site, which revealed that these proteins may participate in fat metabolism. Five identified proteins were selected for immunoblot validation, and 3 proteins were confirmed. Conclusion: Our results suggest that inflammatory process may play a role in kidney uric acid stone formation. Our endogenous metabolic pathway analysis data revealed that these proteins may participate in lipid metabolism. Whether this finding implies a relation between lipotoxicity and kidney uric acid stone former requires further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-266
Number of pages7
JournalUrology
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Aug 1

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Uric Acid
Proteomics
Kidney
Proteins
Encyclopedias
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Software
Genome
Protein Databases
Urinary Calculi
Gene Ontology
Reverse-Phase Chromatography
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Lipid Metabolism
Genes
Fats
Inflammation
Calcium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Jou, Y. C., Fang, C. Y., Chen, S. Y., Chen, F. H., Cheng, M. C., Shen, C. H., ... Tsai, Y-S. (2012). Proteomic study of renal uric acid stone. Urology, 80(2), 260-266. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2012.02.019
Jou, Yeong Chin ; Fang, Chiung Yao ; Chen, Syue Yi ; Chen, Fang Hung ; Cheng, Ming Chin ; Shen, Cheng Huang ; Liao, Li Wen ; Tsai, Yuh-Shyan. / Proteomic study of renal uric acid stone. In: Urology. 2012 ; Vol. 80, No. 2. pp. 260-266.
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Jou, YC, Fang, CY, Chen, SY, Chen, FH, Cheng, MC, Shen, CH, Liao, LW & Tsai, Y-S 2012, 'Proteomic study of renal uric acid stone', Urology, vol. 80, no. 2, pp. 260-266. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2012.02.019

Proteomic study of renal uric acid stone. / Jou, Yeong Chin; Fang, Chiung Yao; Chen, Syue Yi; Chen, Fang Hung; Cheng, Ming Chin; Shen, Cheng Huang; Liao, Li Wen; Tsai, Yuh-Shyan.

In: Urology, Vol. 80, No. 2, 01.08.2012, p. 260-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Jou YC, Fang CY, Chen SY, Chen FH, Cheng MC, Shen CH et al. Proteomic study of renal uric acid stone. Urology. 2012 Aug 1;80(2):260-266. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2012.02.019