Public knowledge, attitudes and willingness regarding bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A nationwide survey in Taiwan

Edward Pei-Chuan Huang, Wen Chu Chiang, Ming Ju Hsieh, Hui Chih Wang, Chih Wei Yang, Tsung Chien Lu, Chih Hung Wang, Kah Meng Chong, Chih Hao Lin, Chan Wei Kuo, Jen Tang Sun, Jr Jiun Lin, Ming Chin Yang, Matthew Huei-Ming Ma

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A low bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rate is one of the factors associated with low cardiac arrest survival. This study aimed to assess knowledge, attitudes, and willingness towards performing CPR and the barriers for implementation of bystander-initiated CPR. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted using an author-designed and validated structured questionnaire in Taiwan. After obtaining a stratified random sample from the census, the results were weighted to match population data. The factors affecting bystander-initiated CPR were analysed using logistic regression. Results: Of the 1073 respondents, half of them stated that they knew how to perform CPR correctly, although 86.7% indicated a willingness to perform CPR on strangers. The barriers to CPR performance reported by the respondents included fear of legal consequences (44%) and concern about harming patients (36.5%). Most participants expressed a willingness to attend only an hour-long CPR course. Respondents who were less likely to indicate a willingness to perform CPR were female, healthcare providers, those who had no cohabiting family members older than 65 years, those who had a history of a stroke, and those who expressed a negative attitude toward CPR. Conclusion: The expressed willingness to perform bystander CPR was high if the respondents possessed the required skills. Attempts should be made to recruit potential bystanders for CPR courses or education, targeting those respondent subgroups less likely to express willingness to perform CPR. The reason for lower bystander CPR willingness among healthcare providers deserves further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)572-581
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Formosan Medical Association
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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    Pei-Chuan Huang, E., Chiang, W. C., Hsieh, M. J., Wang, H. C., Yang, C. W., Lu, T. C., Wang, C. H., Chong, K. M., Lin, C. H., Kuo, C. W., Sun, J. T., Lin, J. J., Yang, M. C., & Huei-Ming Ma, M. (2019). Public knowledge, attitudes and willingness regarding bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A nationwide survey in Taiwan. Journal of the Formosan Medical Association, 118(2), 572-581. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfma.2018.07.018