Recent advances in microfluidic paper-based assay devices for diagnosis of human diseases using saliva, tears and sweat samples

Chin Chung Tseng, Chia Te Kung, Rong Fu Chen, Ming Hsien Tsai, How Ran Chao, Yao Nan Wang, Lung Ming Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microfluidic paper-based analysis devices (μPADs) have undergone tremendous development in recent years and now provide a feasible low-cost alternative to traditional laboratory tests for the diagnosis of many common diseases and disorders. As such, they are of great interest and importance in developing regions of the world with a lack of medical resources and associated infrastructures. This review examines the advances made in microfluidic paper-based diagnostic technology in the past five years and describes the application of microfluidic paper-based assays to the detection of many common human diseases using 3 non-invasive samples sources such as saliva, tears and sweat. The review commences by introducing the basic principles of fluid transport in microfluidic paper-based devices. The structures and actuation systems used in common paper-based devices are then introduced and explained. A systematic review of recent proposals for the application of paper-based devices to the diagnosis of common human diseases is then presented. The review concludes with a brief discussion of the challenges facing the microfluidics paper-based diagnosis field in the coming years and the emerging opportunities for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number130078
JournalSensors and Actuators, B: Chemical
Volume342
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Sep 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Instrumentation
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Materials Chemistry

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