Reduced-dose prasugrel versus clopidogrel for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: A meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies

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Abstract

Whether reduced-dose prasugrel has a better efficacy or safety than standard-dose clopidogrel remains unknown in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library from database inception to May 1, 2020 was performed to compare the clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome or stable coronary artery disease undergoing PCI between those treated with reduced-dose prasugrel and clopidogrel. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the fixed-effect or random-effect model if significant heterogeneity was observed. The primary efficacy endpoint was major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), including cardiovascular (CV) death, myocardial infarction (MI), or ischemic stroke. The primary safety endpoint was all bleeding events. Overall, seven studies with 32,951 patients with PCI were included in the analysis. Reduced-dose prasugrel was associated with a lower risk of MACE than clopidogrel (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67-0.97). Except for MI (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.56-0.98), the secondary efficacy endpoints of CV death, ischemic stroke, all-cause death, and stent thrombosis were similar. For the primary safety endpoint of all bleeding events, there was no significant difference between reduced-dose prasugrel and clopidogrel (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.87-1.98), but the risk of minor bleeding was significantly higher in reduced-dose prasugrel (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.25-2.41). In patients undergoing PCI, a lower risk of MACE was found in patients receiving reduced-dose prasugrel than in those with clopidogrel, but a higher risk of minor bleeding events was noted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-255
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Heart Journal
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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