Reducing population stratification bias

stratum matching is better than exposure

Wen Chung Lee, Liang-Yi Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Genetic studies of complex human diseases rely heavily on the epidemiologic association paradigm, particularly the population-based case-control designs. This study aims to compare the matching effectiveness in terms of bias reduction between exposure matching and stratum matching. Study Design and Setting: Formulas for population stratification bias were derived. An index of matching effectiveness was constructed to compare the two types of matching. Results: It was found that exposure matching can paradoxically increase the magnitude of population stratification bias sometimes, whereas stratum matching can guarantee to reduce it. Conclusion: The authors propose two simple rules for genetic association studies: (a) to match on anything that helps to delineate population strata such as race, ethnicity, nationality, ancestry, and birthplace and (b) to match on an exposure only when it is a strong predictor of the disease and is expected to have great variation in prevalence across population strata.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-66
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan 1

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Population
Genetic Association Studies
Ethnic Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

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Reducing population stratification bias : stratum matching is better than exposure. / Lee, Wen Chung; Wang, Liang-Yi.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 62, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 62-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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