Regulation of cell signaling and apoptosis by tumor suppressor WWOX

Jui Yen Lo, Ying Tsen Chou, Feng Jie Lai, Li-Jin Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human fragile WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (named WWOX, FOR, or WOX1). Functional suppression of WWOX prevents apoptotic cell death induced by a variety of stress stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor, UV radiation, and chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Loss of WWOX gene expression due to gene deletions, loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, or epigenetic silencing is frequently observed in human malignant cancer cells. Acquisition of chemoresistance in squamous cell carcinoma, osteosarcoma, and breast cancer cells is associated with WWOX deficiency. WWOX protein physically interacts with many signaling molecules and exerts its regulatory effects on gene transcription and protein stability and subcellular localization to control cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, and metabolism. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which WWOX regulates cellular functions and stress responses. A potential scenario is that activation of WWOX by anticancer drugs is needed to overcome chemoresistance and trigger cancer cell death, suggesting that WWOX can be regarded as a prognostic marker and a candidate molecule for targeted cancer therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-391
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental Biology and Medicine
Volume240
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 25

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Cell signaling
Tumors
Genes
Cell death
Apoptosis
Cells
Drug therapy
Neoplasms
Molecules
Cell Death
Cell proliferation
Transcription
Metabolism
Gene expression
Ultraviolet radiation
Genetic Translocation
Protein Stability
Loss of Heterozygosity
Autophagy
Gene Deletion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Lo, Jui Yen ; Chou, Ying Tsen ; Lai, Feng Jie ; Hsu, Li-Jin. / Regulation of cell signaling and apoptosis by tumor suppressor WWOX. In: Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 240, No. 3. pp. 383-391.
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Regulation of cell signaling and apoptosis by tumor suppressor WWOX. / Lo, Jui Yen; Chou, Ying Tsen; Lai, Feng Jie; Hsu, Li-Jin.

In: Experimental Biology and Medicine, Vol. 240, No. 3, 25.03.2015, p. 383-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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