Relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors

Chia Chen Wu, Ying-Ju Chang, Thai Form Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Subordinate trust behavior is influenced by perception of supervisor trustworthiness. There has been little domestic research exploring factors associated with nurse manager trustworthiness. Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors. Methods: A cross-sectional correlation design was used to survey the perceptions of nurses working in a medical center. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. A total of 487 valid questionnaires were collected. Results: (1) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behavior both scored above average (4.92 and 4.68, respectively); (2) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness correlated positively with nurse trust behaviors, and head nurse integrity was the most significant correlation coefficient with nurse trust behaviors; (3) Nurse age and duration of work experience correlated positively with perception of head nurse trustworthiness and trust behavior scores. Clinical ladder level correlated positively with trust behavior scores, which were also higher among nurses who were married nurses and who had children. Age, duration of work experience, and clinical ladder level were found to be significant predictors of trust behavior in nurses. Conclusions / Implications for practice: Results demonstrate the significant influence of certain factors on nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and on nurse trust behavior. Such may be referenced by supervisors as a basis of adjusting administrative management approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Nursing and Healthcare Research
Volume6
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Supervisory Nursing
Nurses
Career Mobility
Nurse Administrators

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{05e8e9c9b81a48be87199d0df4e3b9f6,
title = "Relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors",
abstract = "Background: Subordinate trust behavior is influenced by perception of supervisor trustworthiness. There has been little domestic research exploring factors associated with nurse manager trustworthiness. Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors. Methods: A cross-sectional correlation design was used to survey the perceptions of nurses working in a medical center. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. A total of 487 valid questionnaires were collected. Results: (1) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behavior both scored above average (4.92 and 4.68, respectively); (2) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness correlated positively with nurse trust behaviors, and head nurse integrity was the most significant correlation coefficient with nurse trust behaviors; (3) Nurse age and duration of work experience correlated positively with perception of head nurse trustworthiness and trust behavior scores. Clinical ladder level correlated positively with trust behavior scores, which were also higher among nurses who were married nurses and who had children. Age, duration of work experience, and clinical ladder level were found to be significant predictors of trust behavior in nurses. Conclusions / Implications for practice: Results demonstrate the significant influence of certain factors on nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and on nurse trust behavior. Such may be referenced by supervisors as a basis of adjusting administrative management approaches.",
author = "Wu, {Chia Chen} and Ying-Ju Chang and Chen, {Thai Form}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "243--252",
journal = "Journal of Nursing and Healthcare Research",
issn = "2072-9235",
publisher = "Taiwan Nurses Association",
number = "4",

}

Relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors. / Wu, Chia Chen; Chang, Ying-Ju; Chen, Thai Form.

In: Journal of Nursing and Healthcare Research, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.2010, p. 243-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors

AU - Wu, Chia Chen

AU - Chang, Ying-Ju

AU - Chen, Thai Form

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - Background: Subordinate trust behavior is influenced by perception of supervisor trustworthiness. There has been little domestic research exploring factors associated with nurse manager trustworthiness. Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors. Methods: A cross-sectional correlation design was used to survey the perceptions of nurses working in a medical center. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. A total of 487 valid questionnaires were collected. Results: (1) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behavior both scored above average (4.92 and 4.68, respectively); (2) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness correlated positively with nurse trust behaviors, and head nurse integrity was the most significant correlation coefficient with nurse trust behaviors; (3) Nurse age and duration of work experience correlated positively with perception of head nurse trustworthiness and trust behavior scores. Clinical ladder level correlated positively with trust behavior scores, which were also higher among nurses who were married nurses and who had children. Age, duration of work experience, and clinical ladder level were found to be significant predictors of trust behavior in nurses. Conclusions / Implications for practice: Results demonstrate the significant influence of certain factors on nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and on nurse trust behavior. Such may be referenced by supervisors as a basis of adjusting administrative management approaches.

AB - Background: Subordinate trust behavior is influenced by perception of supervisor trustworthiness. There has been little domestic research exploring factors associated with nurse manager trustworthiness. Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the relationship between nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behaviors. Methods: A cross-sectional correlation design was used to survey the perceptions of nurses working in a medical center. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. A total of 487 valid questionnaires were collected. Results: (1) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and nurse trust behavior both scored above average (4.92 and 4.68, respectively); (2) Nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness correlated positively with nurse trust behaviors, and head nurse integrity was the most significant correlation coefficient with nurse trust behaviors; (3) Nurse age and duration of work experience correlated positively with perception of head nurse trustworthiness and trust behavior scores. Clinical ladder level correlated positively with trust behavior scores, which were also higher among nurses who were married nurses and who had children. Age, duration of work experience, and clinical ladder level were found to be significant predictors of trust behavior in nurses. Conclusions / Implications for practice: Results demonstrate the significant influence of certain factors on nurse perceptions of head nurse trustworthiness and on nurse trust behavior. Such may be referenced by supervisors as a basis of adjusting administrative management approaches.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865114155&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865114155&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 243

EP - 252

JO - Journal of Nursing and Healthcare Research

JF - Journal of Nursing and Healthcare Research

SN - 2072-9235

IS - 4

ER -