Responsiveness and Predictive Validity of the Hierarchical Balance Short Forms in People With Stroke

Wan Hui Yu, Kuan-Lin Chen, Yeh Tai Chou, I. Ping Hsueh, Ching Lin Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The lack of knowledge about the responsiveness and predictive validity of a set of Hierarchical Balance Short Forms (the HBSF) in people with stroke limits the utility of the HBSF in both clinical and research settings. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the responsiveness and predictive validity of the HBSF in people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke. Design A prospective cohort study was conducted. Methods Sixty-six participants completed both the 6-item HBSF and the 12-item Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (PASS) after admission to the rehabilitation ward and before hospital discharge. The standardized effect size (ES) and the standardized response mean (SRM) were used to investigate the internal responsiveness of the HBSF and the PASS. Changes in the Barthel Index and the mobility subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement were used as the external criteria for examining external responsiveness. Moreover, the admission scores on the HBSF and the PASS and the discharge scores on the Barthel Index and mobility subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement were analyzed to investigate the predictive validity of the 2 balance measures. Results The internal responsiveness of the HBSF was high (ES>0.9, SRM>1.6). The SRM of the HBSF was significantly larger than that of the PASS, whereas the ES of the HBSF was not significantly larger than that of the PASS. The external responsiveness and predictive validity of the HBSF were sufficient and similar to those of the PASS (external responsiveness: r≥.35; predictive validity: r≥.67). Limitations The convenience sampling of people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke may limit the generalization of the results. Conclusions The HBSF has sufficient responsiveness and predictive validity in people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke and is thus recommended for both clinicians and researchers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)798-808
Number of pages11
JournalPhysical Therapy
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jun 1

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Stroke
Inpatients
Cohort Studies
Rehabilitation
Research Personnel
Stroke Rehabilitation
Prospective Studies
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Yu, Wan Hui ; Chen, Kuan-Lin ; Chou, Yeh Tai ; Hsueh, I. Ping ; Hsieh, Ching Lin. / Responsiveness and Predictive Validity of the Hierarchical Balance Short Forms in People With Stroke. In: Physical Therapy. 2013 ; Vol. 93, No. 6. pp. 798-808.
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Responsiveness and Predictive Validity of the Hierarchical Balance Short Forms in People With Stroke. / Yu, Wan Hui; Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chou, Yeh Tai; Hsueh, I. Ping; Hsieh, Ching Lin.

In: Physical Therapy, Vol. 93, No. 6, 01.06.2013, p. 798-808.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Background The lack of knowledge about the responsiveness and predictive validity of a set of Hierarchical Balance Short Forms (the HBSF) in people with stroke limits the utility of the HBSF in both clinical and research settings. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the responsiveness and predictive validity of the HBSF in people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke. Design A prospective cohort study was conducted. Methods Sixty-six participants completed both the 6-item HBSF and the 12-item Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (PASS) after admission to the rehabilitation ward and before hospital discharge. The standardized effect size (ES) and the standardized response mean (SRM) were used to investigate the internal responsiveness of the HBSF and the PASS. Changes in the Barthel Index and the mobility subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement were used as the external criteria for examining external responsiveness. Moreover, the admission scores on the HBSF and the PASS and the discharge scores on the Barthel Index and mobility subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement were analyzed to investigate the predictive validity of the 2 balance measures. Results The internal responsiveness of the HBSF was high (ES>0.9, SRM>1.6). The SRM of the HBSF was significantly larger than that of the PASS, whereas the ES of the HBSF was not significantly larger than that of the PASS. The external responsiveness and predictive validity of the HBSF were sufficient and similar to those of the PASS (external responsiveness: r≥.35; predictive validity: r≥.67). Limitations The convenience sampling of people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke may limit the generalization of the results. Conclusions The HBSF has sufficient responsiveness and predictive validity in people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke and is thus recommended for both clinicians and researchers.

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