Role of psychiatrists in the diagnosis and management of alzheimer’s disease “revisited”

A review and clinical opinion

Ahmed El-Shafei, Tarek Asaad, Tarek Darwish, Mohamad Hussain Habil, Ronnachai Kongsakon, Chia Yih Liu, Joel Raskin, Gerardo Carmelo Salazar, Shenxun Shi, Gang Wang, Liwei Wang, Yen-Kuang Yang, Ju Fen Yeh, Héctor José Dueñas Tentori

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The number of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is expected to increase substantially in the near future. In the recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the terminology related to AD has shifted from “dementia” to major or mild “neurocognitive disorder”, emphasizing the cognitive impairment that occurs relatively early in the disease process. The concept of “mild neurocognitive disorder” or “mild cognitive impairment” promotes early detection and diagnosis of AD, particularly by psychiatrists, who often consult the DSM-5. This narrative review describes the current and future role of psychiatrists in the diagnosis and management of AD, focusing on the DSM-5 criteria for mild and major neurocognitive disorder. We summarize some of the key instruments used to assess cognition and the neuropsychiatric and behavioral symptoms that often accompany early AD, neuroimaging diagnostic tools, and newly available AD-specific biomarkers that enhance the ability of clinicians to diagnose early AD. We also briefly describe current and emerging pharmacological treatments for AD that target amyloid and tau and that may modify disease progression. Finally, we provide our clinical opinion on the future role of psychiatrists in AD, the education and training necessary to fulfil this role, interactions between psychiatrists and other specialists as part of a multidisciplinary team, and the potential for routine screening of cognitive function among elderly people.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-241
Number of pages18
JournalCurrent Psychiatry Reviews
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 1

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Psychiatry
Alzheimer Disease
Cognition
Behavioral Symptoms
Aptitude
Amyloid
Terminology
Neuroimaging
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Dementia
Disease Progression
Early Diagnosis
Biomarkers
Cognitive Dysfunction
Pharmacology
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

El-Shafei, A., Asaad, T., Darwish, T., Hussain Habil, M., Kongsakon, R., Liu, C. Y., ... Tentori, H. J. D. (2017). Role of psychiatrists in the diagnosis and management of alzheimer’s disease “revisited”: A review and clinical opinion. Current Psychiatry Reviews, 13(3), 224-241. https://doi.org/10.2174/1573400513666170921163932
El-Shafei, Ahmed ; Asaad, Tarek ; Darwish, Tarek ; Hussain Habil, Mohamad ; Kongsakon, Ronnachai ; Liu, Chia Yih ; Raskin, Joel ; Salazar, Gerardo Carmelo ; Shi, Shenxun ; Wang, Gang ; Wang, Liwei ; Yang, Yen-Kuang ; Yeh, Ju Fen ; Tentori, Héctor José Dueñas. / Role of psychiatrists in the diagnosis and management of alzheimer’s disease “revisited” : A review and clinical opinion. In: Current Psychiatry Reviews. 2017 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 224-241.
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El-Shafei, A, Asaad, T, Darwish, T, Hussain Habil, M, Kongsakon, R, Liu, CY, Raskin, J, Salazar, GC, Shi, S, Wang, G, Wang, L, Yang, Y-K, Yeh, JF & Tentori, HJD 2017, 'Role of psychiatrists in the diagnosis and management of alzheimer’s disease “revisited”: A review and clinical opinion', Current Psychiatry Reviews, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 224-241. https://doi.org/10.2174/1573400513666170921163932

Role of psychiatrists in the diagnosis and management of alzheimer’s disease “revisited” : A review and clinical opinion. / El-Shafei, Ahmed; Asaad, Tarek; Darwish, Tarek; Hussain Habil, Mohamad; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Liu, Chia Yih; Raskin, Joel; Salazar, Gerardo Carmelo; Shi, Shenxun; Wang, Gang; Wang, Liwei; Yang, Yen-Kuang; Yeh, Ju Fen; Tentori, Héctor José Dueñas.

In: Current Psychiatry Reviews, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 224-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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