Serum lipids and lipoprotein(a) concentrations in Chinese NIDDM patients

Relation to metabolic control

Chih-Jen Chang, Jau Tsuen Kao, Ta Jen Wu, Feng-Hwa Lu, Tong Yuan Tai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE- To compare serum blood lipids and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels in Chinese non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients and nondiabetic control subjects and also to determine the influence of diabetes control on serum Lp(a) concentration in Chinese individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- We compared the serum blood lipids and Lp(a) levels in NIDDM patients (n = 100) and age- and sex-matched nondiabetic subjects (n = 100) who participated in a case-control study. Comparisons of Lp(a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) <8.0%, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) of 8% or higher. RESULTS- The diabetic patients had higher total triglyceride, apolipoprotein B (apo B), and apo B-to-apo AI ratios, but lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apo AI concentrations than nondiabetic controls (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of Lp(a) levels according to the degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with NIDDM and nondiabetic controls. No correlation was observed between Lp(a) levels and total cholesterol, low- density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apo AI, apo B, and triglyceride levels in all diabetic patients. No difference in the Lp(a) levels was noted between diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects, even in poorly controlled diabetic patients. CONCLUSIONS- In conclusion, Lp(a) levels are not elevated in diabetic patients, even in poorly controlled metabolic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1191-1194
Number of pages4
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Jan 1

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Lipoprotein(a)
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Lipids
Serum
Apolipoprotein A-I
Apolipoproteins B
HDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
LDL Cholesterol
Case-Control Studies
Research Design
Cholesterol
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this

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title = "Serum lipids and lipoprotein(a) concentrations in Chinese NIDDM patients: Relation to metabolic control",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE- To compare serum blood lipids and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels in Chinese non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients and nondiabetic control subjects and also to determine the influence of diabetes control on serum Lp(a) concentration in Chinese individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- We compared the serum blood lipids and Lp(a) levels in NIDDM patients (n = 100) and age- and sex-matched nondiabetic subjects (n = 100) who participated in a case-control study. Comparisons of Lp(a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) <8.0{\%}, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) of 8{\%} or higher. RESULTS- The diabetic patients had higher total triglyceride, apolipoprotein B (apo B), and apo B-to-apo AI ratios, but lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apo AI concentrations than nondiabetic controls (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of Lp(a) levels according to the degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with NIDDM and nondiabetic controls. No correlation was observed between Lp(a) levels and total cholesterol, low- density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apo AI, apo B, and triglyceride levels in all diabetic patients. No difference in the Lp(a) levels was noted between diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects, even in poorly controlled diabetic patients. CONCLUSIONS- In conclusion, Lp(a) levels are not elevated in diabetic patients, even in poorly controlled metabolic conditions.",
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Serum lipids and lipoprotein(a) concentrations in Chinese NIDDM patients : Relation to metabolic control. / Chang, Chih-Jen; Kao, Jau Tsuen; Wu, Ta Jen; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Tai, Tong Yuan.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 18, No. 8, 01.01.1995, p. 1191-1194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Serum lipids and lipoprotein(a) concentrations in Chinese NIDDM patients

T2 - Relation to metabolic control

AU - Chang, Chih-Jen

AU - Kao, Jau Tsuen

AU - Wu, Ta Jen

AU - Lu, Feng-Hwa

AU - Tai, Tong Yuan

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE- To compare serum blood lipids and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels in Chinese non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients and nondiabetic control subjects and also to determine the influence of diabetes control on serum Lp(a) concentration in Chinese individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- We compared the serum blood lipids and Lp(a) levels in NIDDM patients (n = 100) and age- and sex-matched nondiabetic subjects (n = 100) who participated in a case-control study. Comparisons of Lp(a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) <8.0%, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) of 8% or higher. RESULTS- The diabetic patients had higher total triglyceride, apolipoprotein B (apo B), and apo B-to-apo AI ratios, but lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apo AI concentrations than nondiabetic controls (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of Lp(a) levels according to the degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with NIDDM and nondiabetic controls. No correlation was observed between Lp(a) levels and total cholesterol, low- density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apo AI, apo B, and triglyceride levels in all diabetic patients. No difference in the Lp(a) levels was noted between diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects, even in poorly controlled diabetic patients. CONCLUSIONS- In conclusion, Lp(a) levels are not elevated in diabetic patients, even in poorly controlled metabolic conditions.

AB - OBJECTIVE- To compare serum blood lipids and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels in Chinese non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients and nondiabetic control subjects and also to determine the influence of diabetes control on serum Lp(a) concentration in Chinese individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- We compared the serum blood lipids and Lp(a) levels in NIDDM patients (n = 100) and age- and sex-matched nondiabetic subjects (n = 100) who participated in a case-control study. Comparisons of Lp(a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) <8.0%, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA(1c) of 8% or higher. RESULTS- The diabetic patients had higher total triglyceride, apolipoprotein B (apo B), and apo B-to-apo AI ratios, but lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apo AI concentrations than nondiabetic controls (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of Lp(a) levels according to the degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with NIDDM and nondiabetic controls. No correlation was observed between Lp(a) levels and total cholesterol, low- density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apo AI, apo B, and triglyceride levels in all diabetic patients. No difference in the Lp(a) levels was noted between diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects, even in poorly controlled diabetic patients. CONCLUSIONS- In conclusion, Lp(a) levels are not elevated in diabetic patients, even in poorly controlled metabolic conditions.

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U2 - 10.2337/diacare.18.8.1191

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JF - Diabetes Care

SN - 1935-5548

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