Site response variation due to the existence of near-field cracks based on strong motion records in the Shi-Wen river valley, southern Taiwan

Chi Shin Wu, Teng To Yu, Wen Fei Peng, Yeoin Tein Yeh, Sih Siao Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Site effect analysis has been applied to investigate soil classification, alluvium depth, and fracture detection, although the majority of previous studies have typically focused only on the response of large-scale single structures. In contrast, we investigated the site effect for small-scale cracks using a case study in southern Taiwan to provide a means of monitoring slope stability or foundation integrity in situ using only an accelerometer. We adopted both the reference site and horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio methods. We obtained seismographs associated with the typhoon-related development of a crack set (52 m long, 5 m deep) in a steep slope and compared the resonance frequency between two conditions (with and without cracks). Moreover, we divided the seismic waves into P, S, and coda waves and examined the seismic source effect. Our results demonstrate that frequencies of 14.5-17.5 Hz are most sensitive to these cracks, particularly for the E-W component of the P-waves, which coincides with the crack's strike. Peak ground acceleration, which is controlled by seismic moment and attenuated distance, is another important factor determining the resonance results. Our results demonstrate that the ratio of temporal seismic waves can be used to detect the existence of nearby subsurface cracks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number055002
JournalJournal of Geophysics and Engineering
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Geology
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Site response variation due to the existence of near-field cracks based on strong motion records in the Shi-Wen river valley, southern Taiwan'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this