Social brain dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson's disease: A review of theory of mind studies

Rwei-Ling Yu, Ruey Meei Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human social interaction is essential in daily life and crucial for a promising life, especially in people who suffer from disease. Theory of Mind (ToM) is fundamental in social interaction and is described as the ability to impute the mental states of others in social situations. Studies have proposed that a complex neuroanatomical network that includes the frontal cortex mediates ToM. The primary neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD) involves the frontal-striatal system; therefore, patients with PD are expected to exhibit deficits in ToM. In this review, we summarize the current research with a particular focus on the patterns of impaired ToM, potential mediators of ToM, and the impact of ToM deficits on clinical disability in PD. Further studies to investigate the progression of ToM and its relationship with dementia in subjects in PD are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7
JournalTranslational Neurodegeneration
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 28

Fingerprint

Theory of Mind
Parkinson Disease
Brain
Interpersonal Relations
Corpus Striatum
Aptitude
Frontal Lobe
Dementia
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

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Social brain dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson's disease : A review of theory of mind studies. / Yu, Rwei-Ling; Wu, Ruey Meei.

In: Translational Neurodegeneration, Vol. 2, No. 1, 7, 28.03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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