Spatial measurement of mobility barriers: Improving the environment of community-dwelling older adults in Taiwan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mobility barriers can impede physical activity, increase the fear of falling, and pose a threat to the ability of older adults to live independently. This study investigated outdoor mobility barriers within a nonretirement public housing community located in Tainan, Taiwan. Site observations and interviews with older adult residents determined that parked motor scooters, potted plants, the rubber tiles of play areas, and a set of steps were the most important barriers. In addition, the space syntax parameters of control value and mean depth were effectively able to quantitatively measure improvements in walkability resulting from the hypothesized removal of these four barriers. These measures of improved walkability can be included in a cost-benefit analysis of spatial improvement factors to help policymakers address the mobility and accessibility needs of older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-297
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Apr 1

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Accidental Falls
Public Housing
Independent Living
Aptitude
Rubber
Taiwan
Fear
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Interviews
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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