Species turnover in tropical montane forest avifauna links to climatic correlates

Chi Feng Tsai, Ya Fu Lee, Yun Hsiu Chen, Wei Ming Chen, Yen Min Kuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined avifauna richness and composition in Taiwan's tropical montane forests, and compared to historical records dated 22 years ago. A richness attrition of 44 species caused a discrepancy of 30.2%, and an estimated yearly turnover of 2.2%. More resident species that were narrower or lower in elevation distribution, insectivores/omnivores, small to medium-sized, forest/open-field dwelling, and canopy/ground foragers, vanished; whereas piscivores, carnivores, riparian- and shrub-dwellers, ground and mid-layer foragers, and migrants suffered by higher proportions. Occurrence frequencies of persistent species remained constant but varied among ecological groups, indicating an increased homogeneity for smaller-sized insectivores/omnivores dwelling in the forest canopy, shrub, or understory. While the overall annual temperature slightly increased, a relatively stable mean temperature was replaced by an ascending trend from the mid-1990s until 2002, followed by a cooling down. Mean maximum temperatures increased but minimums decreased gradually over years, resulting in increasing temperature differences up to over 16°C. This accompanied an increase of extreme typhoons affecting Taiwan or directly striking these montane forests during the last decade. These results, given no direct human disturbances were noted, suggest a link between the species turnover and recent climate change, and convey warning signs of conservation concerns for tropical montane assemblages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)541-552
Number of pages12
JournalGlobal Ecology and Conservation
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

avifauna
montane forest
montane forests
tropical forests
tropical forest
turnover
insectivore
insectivores
omnivores
Taiwan
temperature
shrub
shrubs
typhoons
piscivore
forest canopy
historical record
carnivore
carnivores
homogeneity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Tsai, Chi Feng ; Lee, Ya Fu ; Chen, Yun Hsiu ; Chen, Wei Ming ; Kuo, Yen Min. / Species turnover in tropical montane forest avifauna links to climatic correlates. In: Global Ecology and Conservation. 2015 ; Vol. 3. pp. 541-552.
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Species turnover in tropical montane forest avifauna links to climatic correlates. / Tsai, Chi Feng; Lee, Ya Fu; Chen, Yun Hsiu; Chen, Wei Ming; Kuo, Yen Min.

In: Global Ecology and Conservation, Vol. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 541-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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