Speed effect on lower extremity biomechanics during shuttle run

S. C. Lu, C. Y. Huang, I. J. Tsai, P. C. Tsao, M. C. Guo, Fong-chin Su

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Shuttle run, or side-step cutting, is a common warm-up exercise for athletes. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury was reported to occur during the single-limb support landing, such as shuttle run. There is little attention about the speed effect on lower extremity (L/E) biomechanics during shuttle run. The purpose of this study was to investigate the L/E biomechanics at two different speeds during shuttle run. A rate of 125 bpm was defined as the slow speed in this study, and 140 bpm as the fast speed. 6 young athletes without history of L/E illness were recruited. Helen Hayes marker set was adopted, and the motion capture system was used to detect the trajectories of the passive markers. Ground reaction force (GRF) was synchronously measured by a force plate. The period of foot contact with force plate was divided into weight acceptance phase and pushing phase. The results showed the significant higher vertical GRF at fast speed in the pushing phase (p=0.04). Less knee flexion angle was also demonstrated at the rate of 140 bpm. Higher GRF and less knee flexion were reported as risk factors for ACL injury. Therefore, speed effect on L/E biomechanics during shuttle run should be taken into consideration to prevent ACL injury.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWorld Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
Subtitle of host publicationImage Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics
Pages1808-1810
Number of pages3
Edition4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 1
EventWorld Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics - Munich, Germany
Duration: 2009 Sep 72009 Sep 12

Publication series

NameIFMBE Proceedings
Number4
Volume25
ISSN (Print)1680-0737

Other

OtherWorld Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics
CountryGermany
CityMunich
Period09-09-0709-09-12

Fingerprint

Biomechanics
Ligaments
Landing
Trajectories

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Lu, S. C., Huang, C. Y., Tsai, I. J., Tsao, P. C., Guo, M. C., & Su, F. (2009). Speed effect on lower extremity biomechanics during shuttle run. In World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics (4 ed., pp. 1808-1810). (IFMBE Proceedings; Vol. 25, No. 4). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03882-2-480
Lu, S. C. ; Huang, C. Y. ; Tsai, I. J. ; Tsao, P. C. ; Guo, M. C. ; Su, Fong-chin. / Speed effect on lower extremity biomechanics during shuttle run. World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics. 4. ed. 2009. pp. 1808-1810 (IFMBE Proceedings; 4).
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title = "Speed effect on lower extremity biomechanics during shuttle run",
abstract = "Shuttle run, or side-step cutting, is a common warm-up exercise for athletes. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury was reported to occur during the single-limb support landing, such as shuttle run. There is little attention about the speed effect on lower extremity (L/E) biomechanics during shuttle run. The purpose of this study was to investigate the L/E biomechanics at two different speeds during shuttle run. A rate of 125 bpm was defined as the slow speed in this study, and 140 bpm as the fast speed. 6 young athletes without history of L/E illness were recruited. Helen Hayes marker set was adopted, and the motion capture system was used to detect the trajectories of the passive markers. Ground reaction force (GRF) was synchronously measured by a force plate. The period of foot contact with force plate was divided into weight acceptance phase and pushing phase. The results showed the significant higher vertical GRF at fast speed in the pushing phase (p=0.04). Less knee flexion angle was also demonstrated at the rate of 140 bpm. Higher GRF and less knee flexion were reported as risk factors for ACL injury. Therefore, speed effect on L/E biomechanics during shuttle run should be taken into consideration to prevent ACL injury.",
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Lu, SC, Huang, CY, Tsai, IJ, Tsao, PC, Guo, MC & Su, F 2009, Speed effect on lower extremity biomechanics during shuttle run. in World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics. 4 edn, IFMBE Proceedings, no. 4, vol. 25, pp. 1808-1810, World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics, Munich, Germany, 09-09-07. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03882-2-480

Speed effect on lower extremity biomechanics during shuttle run. / Lu, S. C.; Huang, C. Y.; Tsai, I. J.; Tsao, P. C.; Guo, M. C.; Su, Fong-chin.

World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics. 4. ed. 2009. p. 1808-1810 (IFMBE Proceedings; Vol. 25, No. 4).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Shuttle run, or side-step cutting, is a common warm-up exercise for athletes. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury was reported to occur during the single-limb support landing, such as shuttle run. There is little attention about the speed effect on lower extremity (L/E) biomechanics during shuttle run. The purpose of this study was to investigate the L/E biomechanics at two different speeds during shuttle run. A rate of 125 bpm was defined as the slow speed in this study, and 140 bpm as the fast speed. 6 young athletes without history of L/E illness were recruited. Helen Hayes marker set was adopted, and the motion capture system was used to detect the trajectories of the passive markers. Ground reaction force (GRF) was synchronously measured by a force plate. The period of foot contact with force plate was divided into weight acceptance phase and pushing phase. The results showed the significant higher vertical GRF at fast speed in the pushing phase (p=0.04). Less knee flexion angle was also demonstrated at the rate of 140 bpm. Higher GRF and less knee flexion were reported as risk factors for ACL injury. Therefore, speed effect on L/E biomechanics during shuttle run should be taken into consideration to prevent ACL injury.

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Lu SC, Huang CY, Tsai IJ, Tsao PC, Guo MC, Su F. Speed effect on lower extremity biomechanics during shuttle run. In World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering: Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics. 4 ed. 2009. p. 1808-1810. (IFMBE Proceedings; 4). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03882-2-480