Standing balance of children with developmental coordination disorder under altered sensory conditions

Rong-Ju Cherng, Yung Wen Hsu, Yung Jung Chen, Jenn Yeu Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maintenance of standing balance requires that sensory inputs be organized with the motor system. Current data regarding the influence of sensory inputs on standing balance in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) are limited. This study compared the influence of sensory organization and each sensory input on the standing stability between a group of 20 children, 4-6 years old, with DCD and an age- and gender-matched control group of 20 children. Three types of visual inputs (eyes open, eyes closed, or unreliable vision) and two types of somatosensory inputs (fixed or compliant foot support) were varied factorially to yield six sensory conditions. Standing stability was measured with a Kistler force plate for 30 s and expressed as the center of pressure sway area. The results showed that the standing stability of the children with DCD was significantly poorer than that of the control children under all sensory conditions, especially when the somatosensory input was unreliable (compliant foot support) compared to when it was reliable (fixed foot support). The effectiveness of an individual sensory system, when it was the dominant source of sensory input, did not significantly differ between the groups. The results suggest that children with DCD experience more difficulty coping with altered sensory inputs, and that such difficulty is more likely due to a deficit in sensory organization rather than compromised effectiveness of individual sensory systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)913-926
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Dec 1

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Motor Skills Disorders
Foot
Research Design
Maintenance
Pressure
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Cherng, Rong-Ju ; Hsu, Yung Wen ; Chen, Yung Jung ; Chen, Jenn Yeu. / Standing balance of children with developmental coordination disorder under altered sensory conditions. In: Human Movement Science. 2007 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 913-926.
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Standing balance of children with developmental coordination disorder under altered sensory conditions. / Cherng, Rong-Ju; Hsu, Yung Wen; Chen, Yung Jung; Chen, Jenn Yeu.

In: Human Movement Science, Vol. 26, No. 6, 01.12.2007, p. 913-926.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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