T cells reactive with a small synthetic peptide of the acetylcholine receptor can provide help for a clonotypically heterogeneous antibody response and subsequently impaired muscle function

Trai-Ming Yeh, K. A. Krolick

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Abstract

The influence of T cell specificity was evaluated with regard to its role in the antibody response against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and resulting AChR-dependent muscle dysfunction. The reactivity of immune Th cells was restricted to a small region of the AChR α-subunit (amino acid residues 100-116) reported to be highly immunogenic. T cells primed to this peptide were found to demonstrate significant proliferation when challenged in vitro with either the homologous peptide or the intact AChR. Adoptive transfer of the peptide-immune T cells into immunologically naive recipient rats followed by AChR challenge resulted in the production of anti-AChR antibodies very similar to those produced under the regulation of T cells immune to the entire intact AChR with regard to overall clonotypic heterogeneity (measured by IEF) and their ability to interfere with AChR-dependent muscle contraction. Interestingly, when the threonine at position 106 was substituted with a proline, the resulting peptide continued to be equally, if not exceedingly, capable of stimulating T cell-proliferative responses, but was found to be ineffective at stimulating the levels of anti-AChR antibodies necessary for producing neuromuscular dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1654-1660
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume144
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1990

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Peptide Receptors
Cholinergic Receptors
Antibody Formation
T-Lymphocytes
Muscles
Peptides
T-Cell Antigen Receptor Specificity
Peptide T
Adoptive Transfer
Antibodies
Threonine
Muscle Contraction
Proline
Amino Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology

Cite this

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abstract = "The influence of T cell specificity was evaluated with regard to its role in the antibody response against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and resulting AChR-dependent muscle dysfunction. The reactivity of immune Th cells was restricted to a small region of the AChR α-subunit (amino acid residues 100-116) reported to be highly immunogenic. T cells primed to this peptide were found to demonstrate significant proliferation when challenged in vitro with either the homologous peptide or the intact AChR. Adoptive transfer of the peptide-immune T cells into immunologically naive recipient rats followed by AChR challenge resulted in the production of anti-AChR antibodies very similar to those produced under the regulation of T cells immune to the entire intact AChR with regard to overall clonotypic heterogeneity (measured by IEF) and their ability to interfere with AChR-dependent muscle contraction. Interestingly, when the threonine at position 106 was substituted with a proline, the resulting peptide continued to be equally, if not exceedingly, capable of stimulating T cell-proliferative responses, but was found to be ineffective at stimulating the levels of anti-AChR antibodies necessary for producing neuromuscular dysfunction.",
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N2 - The influence of T cell specificity was evaluated with regard to its role in the antibody response against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and resulting AChR-dependent muscle dysfunction. The reactivity of immune Th cells was restricted to a small region of the AChR α-subunit (amino acid residues 100-116) reported to be highly immunogenic. T cells primed to this peptide were found to demonstrate significant proliferation when challenged in vitro with either the homologous peptide or the intact AChR. Adoptive transfer of the peptide-immune T cells into immunologically naive recipient rats followed by AChR challenge resulted in the production of anti-AChR antibodies very similar to those produced under the regulation of T cells immune to the entire intact AChR with regard to overall clonotypic heterogeneity (measured by IEF) and their ability to interfere with AChR-dependent muscle contraction. Interestingly, when the threonine at position 106 was substituted with a proline, the resulting peptide continued to be equally, if not exceedingly, capable of stimulating T cell-proliferative responses, but was found to be ineffective at stimulating the levels of anti-AChR antibodies necessary for producing neuromuscular dysfunction.

AB - The influence of T cell specificity was evaluated with regard to its role in the antibody response against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and resulting AChR-dependent muscle dysfunction. The reactivity of immune Th cells was restricted to a small region of the AChR α-subunit (amino acid residues 100-116) reported to be highly immunogenic. T cells primed to this peptide were found to demonstrate significant proliferation when challenged in vitro with either the homologous peptide or the intact AChR. Adoptive transfer of the peptide-immune T cells into immunologically naive recipient rats followed by AChR challenge resulted in the production of anti-AChR antibodies very similar to those produced under the regulation of T cells immune to the entire intact AChR with regard to overall clonotypic heterogeneity (measured by IEF) and their ability to interfere with AChR-dependent muscle contraction. Interestingly, when the threonine at position 106 was substituted with a proline, the resulting peptide continued to be equally, if not exceedingly, capable of stimulating T cell-proliferative responses, but was found to be ineffective at stimulating the levels of anti-AChR antibodies necessary for producing neuromuscular dysfunction.

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