Techniques for 3D misalignments calculation for portable devices in cycling applications

Hsiu Wen Chang, Jacques Georgy, Naser El-Sheimy

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thanks to the evolution of motion sensors, human motion can now be easily assessed outside a laboratory with a set of sensors, such as inertial sensors (e.g. accelerometers and gyroscopes), barometers, and magnetometers. With the recent advances in MicroElectro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), MEMS-based sensors can be easily incorporated in small portable devices, such as watches, goggles, shoes, belts, smartphones, or custom-built devices. MEMS-based sensors are low cost, light weight, small in size, and consume low amounts of power. Consequently, these sensors are ideal for use in sport applications, as the use of miniature MEMS-inertial sensors for recording and monitoring human motion has become popular. Extra measurements and constraints can be derived from human motion information using these sensors, and these extra measurements can be used for athlete coaching and enhancing navigation solutions in different sports such as cycling. Self-contained systems are not dependent on the transmission or reception of signals from an external source, thereby minimizing problems such as signal blockage, jamming, and multipath caused by environmental factors. Therefore, self-contained MEMSbased inertial sensors are ideal for providing different information in synthetic environments. They can provide high data rate acceleration measurements and angular rate measurements. The device's relative position, velocity, and attitude can be further derived through integration of these raw measurements. However, the very low-cost MEMS inertial sensors available in consumer portable devices were originally designed for short-term applications; they are not suitable for long-term applications, such as navigation without absolute updates, because of the eventual large accumulation of sensor errors. In addition, the device is either tethered or untethered but located within the platform. These measurements from the sensors need to be transformed from the device's computational space to the platform's computational space. Typically, this is achieved by precise mounting and a proper alignment process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages2862-2867
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1
Event26th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, ION GNSS 2013 - Nashville, TN, United States
Duration: 2013 Sep 162013 Sep 20

Other

Other26th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, ION GNSS 2013
CountryUnited States
CityNashville, TN
Period13-09-1613-09-20

Fingerprint

Sensors
Sports
coaching
costs
athlete
environmental factors
recording
Navigation
Barometers
Goggles
monitoring
Acceleration measurement
Smartphones
Watches
Jamming
Gyroscopes
Magnetometers
Mountings
Accelerometers
Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Transportation

Cite this

Chang, H. W., Georgy, J., & El-Sheimy, N. (2013). Techniques for 3D misalignments calculation for portable devices in cycling applications. 2862-2867. Paper presented at 26th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, ION GNSS 2013, Nashville, TN, United States.
Chang, Hsiu Wen ; Georgy, Jacques ; El-Sheimy, Naser. / Techniques for 3D misalignments calculation for portable devices in cycling applications. Paper presented at 26th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, ION GNSS 2013, Nashville, TN, United States.6 p.
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Chang, HW, Georgy, J & El-Sheimy, N 2013, 'Techniques for 3D misalignments calculation for portable devices in cycling applications', Paper presented at 26th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, ION GNSS 2013, Nashville, TN, United States, 13-09-16 - 13-09-20 pp. 2862-2867.

Techniques for 3D misalignments calculation for portable devices in cycling applications. / Chang, Hsiu Wen; Georgy, Jacques; El-Sheimy, Naser.

2013. 2862-2867 Paper presented at 26th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, ION GNSS 2013, Nashville, TN, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Chang HW, Georgy J, El-Sheimy N. Techniques for 3D misalignments calculation for portable devices in cycling applications. 2013. Paper presented at 26th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, ION GNSS 2013, Nashville, TN, United States.