Temporal patterns of body temperatures in the acute stage of stroke

Shu Han Lin, Kun Lin Chuang, Chou-Ching Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present study aimed to describe the day-by-day temporal patterns of body temperatures in acute stroke and to delineate the differences in serial daily changes in body temperatures between intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and cerebral infarct (CI). Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 90 patients (32 with ICH and 58 with CI), admitted within 12 hours after the onset of stroke. Body temperatures were measured as the tympanic temperatures during the initial 6 days of hospitalization. Patients with clinical infections were excluded. The severity of stroke was assessed by Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS). SSS score ≤30 was defined as severe stroke, and SSS score >30 as mild-to-moderate stroke. Results: Mean body temperature was significantly higher in patients with ICH than those with CI in 0-12 hours, 12-24 hours, 24-48 hours, and 48-72 hours (all p<0.05) after the onset of stroke. Among patients with ICH, the body temperature was significantly higher in the severe group than the mild-to-moderate group during 24-48 hours and 48-72 hours (both p<0.05) after the onset of stroke. No significant difference in body temperatures was observed between patients with severe stroke and patient with mild-to-moderate CI. Conclusions: The serial time course of body temperature in the acute stage of stroke differs between ICH and CI. This study showed that, in ICH but not in CI, the elevation of body temperature has significant association with the stroke severity. Our results may help in the management of hyperthermia during acute stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-183
Number of pages7
JournalActa Neurologica Taiwanica
Volume15
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Sep 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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