TGF-beta1 increases cell rigidity by enhancing expression of smooth muscle actin

Keloid-derived fibroblasts as a model for cellular mechanics

Chih Hung Lee, Chien Hui Hong, Ying Ting Chen, Yu Chien Chen, Meng-Ru Shen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Mechanical transduction contributes to appropriate cell functions. Clinically, keloid, an uncontrolled fibrous overgrowth and scarring, preferentially affects skin areas subject to higher mechanical tension than others. Keloid-derived fibroblasts have exaggerated TGF-beta1-mediated responses, including smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression, cellular contraction, and tissue remodeling, to mechanical strain compared to normal fibroblasts. Objective: This study asked if SMA contributes to cellular intrinsic rigidity using keloid -derived fibroblasts as a model. Method: Using atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy, we measured cellular rigidity and the expression of SMA in keloid fibroblasts treated with exogenous TGF-beta1. Result: There was an increase of SMA expression in keloid tissue as well as keloid-derived fibroblasts. The cell rigidity increased by TGF-beta1 in keloid fibroblasts occurred concomitantly with increases in SMA expression. TGF-beta1 receptor 1 kinase inhibitors reduced TGF-beta1-induced cellular rigidity and SMA expression. Knocking down SMA with interference RNA resulted in a reduction of TGF-beta1-enhanced rigidity, suggesting that TGF-beta1 increases cell rigidity via SMA expression. Conclusion: We conclude that TGF-beta1 increases cell rigidity through TGF-beta1 receptor-SMA axis. This study reports that SMA, at least in part, contributes to cell rigidity in fibroblasts. SMA might be an appealing pharmaceutical target in keloids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-180
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dermatological Science
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Transforming Growth Factor beta1
Keloid
Fibroblasts
Mechanics
Rigidity
Smooth Muscle
Muscle
Actins
Tissue
Confocal microscopy
Atomic Force Microscopy
RNA Interference
Confocal Microscopy
Cicatrix
Atomic force microscopy
Skin
Phosphotransferases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Dermatology

Cite this

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title = "TGF-beta1 increases cell rigidity by enhancing expression of smooth muscle actin: Keloid-derived fibroblasts as a model for cellular mechanics",
abstract = "Background: Mechanical transduction contributes to appropriate cell functions. Clinically, keloid, an uncontrolled fibrous overgrowth and scarring, preferentially affects skin areas subject to higher mechanical tension than others. Keloid-derived fibroblasts have exaggerated TGF-beta1-mediated responses, including smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression, cellular contraction, and tissue remodeling, to mechanical strain compared to normal fibroblasts. Objective: This study asked if SMA contributes to cellular intrinsic rigidity using keloid -derived fibroblasts as a model. Method: Using atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy, we measured cellular rigidity and the expression of SMA in keloid fibroblasts treated with exogenous TGF-beta1. Result: There was an increase of SMA expression in keloid tissue as well as keloid-derived fibroblasts. The cell rigidity increased by TGF-beta1 in keloid fibroblasts occurred concomitantly with increases in SMA expression. TGF-beta1 receptor 1 kinase inhibitors reduced TGF-beta1-induced cellular rigidity and SMA expression. Knocking down SMA with interference RNA resulted in a reduction of TGF-beta1-enhanced rigidity, suggesting that TGF-beta1 increases cell rigidity via SMA expression. Conclusion: We conclude that TGF-beta1 increases cell rigidity through TGF-beta1 receptor-SMA axis. This study reports that SMA, at least in part, contributes to cell rigidity in fibroblasts. SMA might be an appealing pharmaceutical target in keloids.",
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TGF-beta1 increases cell rigidity by enhancing expression of smooth muscle actin : Keloid-derived fibroblasts as a model for cellular mechanics. / Lee, Chih Hung; Hong, Chien Hui; Chen, Ying Ting; Chen, Yu Chien; Shen, Meng-Ru.

In: Journal of Dermatological Science, Vol. 67, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 173-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lee, Chih Hung

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