The best management practices of tea farm on high mountain areas

Ching Gung Wen, Jan Tai Kuo, Chih-Hua Chang, Chih Sheng Lee, Shui Ping Chang, Su Maan Chuang, Pao Wen Liu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to the considerable profit made by planting tea trees on the high mountains in Taiwan, farmers fertilized their tea farms with about 600 kg of N/ha/y and 210 kg of P/ha/y to maintain a high production. However, the tea trees utilized only 5% of the fertilizer, and the remaining 95% of nitrogen and phosphorus were lost. The lost nitrogen and phosphorus caused a problem of eutrophication in the downstreams of a reservoir. The best management practices of the tea farm is to reduce 20% dosage of the fertilizer. Also, the reduction of the 20% can still ensure not to damage the good quality of the tea production.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2004 World Water and Environmetal Resources Congress
Subtitle of host publicationCritical Transitions in Water and Environmental Resources Management
EditorsG. Sehlke, D.F. Hayes, D.K. Stevens
Pages459-466
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event2004 World Water and Environmental Resources Congress: Critical Transitions in Water and Environmental Resources Management - Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Duration: 2004 Jun 272004 Jul 1

Other

Other2004 World Water and Environmental Resources Congress: Critical Transitions in Water and Environmental Resources Management
CountryUnited States
CitySalt Lake City, UT
Period04-06-2704-07-01

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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