The Concerns and Experience of Decision-Making Regarding Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders Among Caregivers in Hospice Palliative Care

Ching Chun Chiang, Shu Chuan Chang, Sheng Yu Fan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order is an important end-of-life decision. In Taiwan, family caregivers are also involved in this decision-making process. This study aimed to explore the concerns and experiences regarding DNR decisions among caregivers in Taiwan. Qualitative study was conducted. Convenience sampling was used, and 26 caregivers were recruited whose patients had a DNR order and had received hospice care or hospice home care. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection, including the previous experiences of DNR discussions with the patients and medical staff and their concerns and difficulties in decision-making. The data analysis was based on the principle of thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) Patients: The caregivers respected the patients’ willingness and did not want to make them feel like “giving up.” (2) Caregivers’ self: They did not want to intensify the patients’ suffering but sometimes found it emotionally difficult to accept death. (3) Other family members: They were concerned about the other family members’ opinions on DNR orders, their blame, and their views on filial impiety. (4) Medical staff: The information and suggestions from the medical staff were foundational to their decision-making. The caregivers needed the health care professionals’ supports to deal with the concerns from patients and other family members as well as their emotional reactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Feb

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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