The effects of auditory hallucination simulation on empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward patients with mental illness among undergraduate students: A systemic review and meta-analysis

Ming Feng Lee, Esther Ching-lan Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background: The negative attitudes of the general public toward mental illness frequently influence the integration of mental illness patients into the community. Auditory hallucination simulation may be considered as a creative teaching strategy to improve the attitudes of learners toward mental illness. However, the empirical effects of auditory hallucination simulation to change the negative attitudes toward mental illness remains uncertain. Purposes: To compare and analyze, using a systematic review and meta-analysis, the effectiveness of auditory hallucination simulation in improving empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness in undergraduates. Methods: A search using the keywords "auditory hallucination" and "simulation" and the 4 outcome indicators of empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness was conducted to identify related articles published between 2008 and 2016 in 6 Chinese and English electronic databases, including Cochrane Library, EBSCO-CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Airiti Library. Research quality was appraised using the Modified Jadad Scale (MJS), the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Level of Evidence (OCEBM LoE), and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results: Eleven studies were recruited, and 7 studies with sufficient data were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that hallucination simulation significantly improved the empathy and knowledge of participants, with respective effect sizes of 0.63 (95% CI [0.21, 1.05]) and 0.69 (95% CI [0.43-0.94]). However, this intervention also increased social distance, with an effect size of 0.60 (95% CI [0.01, 1.19]), and did not change attitudes toward mental illness significantly, with an effect size of 0.33 (95% CI [-0.11, 0.77]). Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Auditory hallucination simulation is an effective teaching strategy for improving the empathy and knowledge of undergraduates. However, related evidence for the effects of social distance and attitudes toward mental illness need to be further strengthened. Most of the extant research on this subject was conducted in the United States and Australia and was of moderate quality. Future studies should use sufficiently rigorous research designs to explore the safety issues and the effectiveness of the auditory hallucination simulation intervention in different countries and ethnic populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-68
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Nursing
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Oct 1

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Social Distance
Hallucinations
Mentally Ill Persons
Meta-Analysis
Students
Libraries
Teaching
Evidence-Based Medicine
Research
PubMed
MEDLINE
Research Design
Databases
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{0139e8169a2d4465b3b8125bf1218e66,
title = "The effects of auditory hallucination simulation on empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward patients with mental illness among undergraduate students: A systemic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background: The negative attitudes of the general public toward mental illness frequently influence the integration of mental illness patients into the community. Auditory hallucination simulation may be considered as a creative teaching strategy to improve the attitudes of learners toward mental illness. However, the empirical effects of auditory hallucination simulation to change the negative attitudes toward mental illness remains uncertain. Purposes: To compare and analyze, using a systematic review and meta-analysis, the effectiveness of auditory hallucination simulation in improving empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness in undergraduates. Methods: A search using the keywords {"}auditory hallucination{"} and {"}simulation{"} and the 4 outcome indicators of empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness was conducted to identify related articles published between 2008 and 2016 in 6 Chinese and English electronic databases, including Cochrane Library, EBSCO-CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Airiti Library. Research quality was appraised using the Modified Jadad Scale (MJS), the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Level of Evidence (OCEBM LoE), and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results: Eleven studies were recruited, and 7 studies with sufficient data were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that hallucination simulation significantly improved the empathy and knowledge of participants, with respective effect sizes of 0.63 (95{\%} CI [0.21, 1.05]) and 0.69 (95{\%} CI [0.43-0.94]). However, this intervention also increased social distance, with an effect size of 0.60 (95{\%} CI [0.01, 1.19]), and did not change attitudes toward mental illness significantly, with an effect size of 0.33 (95{\%} CI [-0.11, 0.77]). Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Auditory hallucination simulation is an effective teaching strategy for improving the empathy and knowledge of undergraduates. However, related evidence for the effects of social distance and attitudes toward mental illness need to be further strengthened. Most of the extant research on this subject was conducted in the United States and Australia and was of moderate quality. Future studies should use sufficiently rigorous research designs to explore the safety issues and the effectiveness of the auditory hallucination simulation intervention in different countries and ethnic populations.",
author = "Lee, {Ming Feng} and Lin, {Esther Ching-lan}",
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journal = "Journal of Nursing",
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T1 - The effects of auditory hallucination simulation on empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward patients with mental illness among undergraduate students

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N2 - Background: The negative attitudes of the general public toward mental illness frequently influence the integration of mental illness patients into the community. Auditory hallucination simulation may be considered as a creative teaching strategy to improve the attitudes of learners toward mental illness. However, the empirical effects of auditory hallucination simulation to change the negative attitudes toward mental illness remains uncertain. Purposes: To compare and analyze, using a systematic review and meta-analysis, the effectiveness of auditory hallucination simulation in improving empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness in undergraduates. Methods: A search using the keywords "auditory hallucination" and "simulation" and the 4 outcome indicators of empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness was conducted to identify related articles published between 2008 and 2016 in 6 Chinese and English electronic databases, including Cochrane Library, EBSCO-CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Airiti Library. Research quality was appraised using the Modified Jadad Scale (MJS), the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Level of Evidence (OCEBM LoE), and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results: Eleven studies were recruited, and 7 studies with sufficient data were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that hallucination simulation significantly improved the empathy and knowledge of participants, with respective effect sizes of 0.63 (95% CI [0.21, 1.05]) and 0.69 (95% CI [0.43-0.94]). However, this intervention also increased social distance, with an effect size of 0.60 (95% CI [0.01, 1.19]), and did not change attitudes toward mental illness significantly, with an effect size of 0.33 (95% CI [-0.11, 0.77]). Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Auditory hallucination simulation is an effective teaching strategy for improving the empathy and knowledge of undergraduates. However, related evidence for the effects of social distance and attitudes toward mental illness need to be further strengthened. Most of the extant research on this subject was conducted in the United States and Australia and was of moderate quality. Future studies should use sufficiently rigorous research designs to explore the safety issues and the effectiveness of the auditory hallucination simulation intervention in different countries and ethnic populations.

AB - Background: The negative attitudes of the general public toward mental illness frequently influence the integration of mental illness patients into the community. Auditory hallucination simulation may be considered as a creative teaching strategy to improve the attitudes of learners toward mental illness. However, the empirical effects of auditory hallucination simulation to change the negative attitudes toward mental illness remains uncertain. Purposes: To compare and analyze, using a systematic review and meta-analysis, the effectiveness of auditory hallucination simulation in improving empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness in undergraduates. Methods: A search using the keywords "auditory hallucination" and "simulation" and the 4 outcome indicators of empathy, knowledge, social distance, and attitudes toward mental illness was conducted to identify related articles published between 2008 and 2016 in 6 Chinese and English electronic databases, including Cochrane Library, EBSCO-CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Airiti Library. Research quality was appraised using the Modified Jadad Scale (MJS), the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Level of Evidence (OCEBM LoE), and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results: Eleven studies were recruited, and 7 studies with sufficient data were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that hallucination simulation significantly improved the empathy and knowledge of participants, with respective effect sizes of 0.63 (95% CI [0.21, 1.05]) and 0.69 (95% CI [0.43-0.94]). However, this intervention also increased social distance, with an effect size of 0.60 (95% CI [0.01, 1.19]), and did not change attitudes toward mental illness significantly, with an effect size of 0.33 (95% CI [-0.11, 0.77]). Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Auditory hallucination simulation is an effective teaching strategy for improving the empathy and knowledge of undergraduates. However, related evidence for the effects of social distance and attitudes toward mental illness need to be further strengthened. Most of the extant research on this subject was conducted in the United States and Australia and was of moderate quality. Future studies should use sufficiently rigorous research designs to explore the safety issues and the effectiveness of the auditory hallucination simulation intervention in different countries and ethnic populations.

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