The Effects of Civic Consciousness and Civil Disobedience on Support for and Participation in Contentious Politics

Ching Hsing Wang, Dennis Lu Chung Weng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the effects of civic consciousness and civil disobedience on individual attitudes toward, and participation in, contentious politics. Using the newly collected survey data on civic consciousness and civil disobedience in Taiwan in 2015, this study finds that both civic consciousness and civil disobedience are significantly associated with individual support for and engagement in contentious politics. Specifically, people with strong civic consciousness and civil disobedience are more likely to support the Sunflower Movement and take part in contentious political activities such as rallies, marches, and strikes. The findings imply that as the ideas of civic consciousness and civil disobedience prevail in a democracy, the public will be more likely to choose to use contentious political activities to express their opinions instead of institutional and legal approaches when the government is unable to respond to public needs in a timely manner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-335
Number of pages23
JournalJapanese Journal of Political Science
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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