The Impact of Traditional Health Beliefs on the Health Practices of Women From Southern Taiwan

Ching Chu Li, Kan Lin Hsu, Chih Hsuan Chen, Bih Ching Shu

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated the health beliefs of Taiwanese women in Anping, an urban district in Taiwan that was introduced to Western medicine in the 1860s. Design: A qualitative design with content analysis was used. Fourteen Anping women aged 44 to 84 years were interviewed. Results: The women integrated both traditional and Western biomedicine without any dissonance. Three themes were found: cultural beliefs about medicine–diet homology or the lack of a distinction between medicine and food, reliance on both doctor and deity, and a pattern of health practice based on situational decision making about which health practice to employ. Implications: Understanding health-related viewpoints in Chinese culture and its rationale will help health workers provide culturally competent care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)473-478
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Transcultural Nursing
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

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