The relationship between different glycemic statuses and colon polyps in a Taiwanese population

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Abstract

Background: While diabetes is considered as a risk factor for colorectal cancer, there are few studies that address the association between glycemic statuses and different colon polyps, ranging from non-neoplastic polyps to advanced adenomatous polyps. Methods: A total of 6,348 participants, consisting of 3,777 men and 2,571 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years, were included for final analysis after excluding subjects with a past history of colorectal cancer, colon polyps/polypectomy, familial adenomatous polyposis, and colorectomy, or missing data. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were defined using the 2011 American Diabetes Association criteria. Subjects were classified into four groups: polyp-free, non-neoplastic polyps, non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes among groups with different kinds of colon polyps. In addition, significant differences were also noted in age, total cholesterol, body mass index, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, and the prevalence of male gender, hypertension, obesity, current smoking and alcohol drinking among groups. In the multinomial logistic regression analyses, diabetes was related to both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while pre-diabetes was only related to non-advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, age ≥65 years and male gender were associated with both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while hypertension and current smoking were independently related to advanced and non-advanced adenomatous polyps, respectively. Conclusions: Diabetes, but not pre-diabetes, was associated with a higher risk of advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, both diabetes and pre-diabetes were important correlates of non-advanced adenomatous polyps.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1145-1151
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Adenomatous Polyps
Polyps
Colon
Population
Colorectal Neoplasms
Smoking
Hypertension
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli
Alcohol Drinking
Colonic Neoplasms
HDL Cholesterol
Fasting
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Logistic Models
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "The relationship between different glycemic statuses and colon polyps in a Taiwanese population",
abstract = "Background: While diabetes is considered as a risk factor for colorectal cancer, there are few studies that address the association between glycemic statuses and different colon polyps, ranging from non-neoplastic polyps to advanced adenomatous polyps. Methods: A total of 6,348 participants, consisting of 3,777 men and 2,571 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years, were included for final analysis after excluding subjects with a past history of colorectal cancer, colon polyps/polypectomy, familial adenomatous polyposis, and colorectomy, or missing data. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were defined using the 2011 American Diabetes Association criteria. Subjects were classified into four groups: polyp-free, non-neoplastic polyps, non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes among groups with different kinds of colon polyps. In addition, significant differences were also noted in age, total cholesterol, body mass index, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, and the prevalence of male gender, hypertension, obesity, current smoking and alcohol drinking among groups. In the multinomial logistic regression analyses, diabetes was related to both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while pre-diabetes was only related to non-advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, age ≥65 years and male gender were associated with both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while hypertension and current smoking were independently related to advanced and non-advanced adenomatous polyps, respectively. Conclusions: Diabetes, but not pre-diabetes, was associated with a higher risk of advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, both diabetes and pre-diabetes were important correlates of non-advanced adenomatous polyps.",
author = "Hsin-En Huang and Yi-Ching Yang and Jin-Shang Wu and Ru-Hsueh Wang and Feng-Hwa Lu and Chih-Jen Chang",
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T1 - The relationship between different glycemic statuses and colon polyps in a Taiwanese population

AU - Huang, Hsin-En

AU - Yang, Yi-Ching

AU - Wu, Jin-Shang

AU - Wang, Ru-Hsueh

AU - Lu, Feng-Hwa

AU - Chang, Chih-Jen

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Background: While diabetes is considered as a risk factor for colorectal cancer, there are few studies that address the association between glycemic statuses and different colon polyps, ranging from non-neoplastic polyps to advanced adenomatous polyps. Methods: A total of 6,348 participants, consisting of 3,777 men and 2,571 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years, were included for final analysis after excluding subjects with a past history of colorectal cancer, colon polyps/polypectomy, familial adenomatous polyposis, and colorectomy, or missing data. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were defined using the 2011 American Diabetes Association criteria. Subjects were classified into four groups: polyp-free, non-neoplastic polyps, non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes among groups with different kinds of colon polyps. In addition, significant differences were also noted in age, total cholesterol, body mass index, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, and the prevalence of male gender, hypertension, obesity, current smoking and alcohol drinking among groups. In the multinomial logistic regression analyses, diabetes was related to both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while pre-diabetes was only related to non-advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, age ≥65 years and male gender were associated with both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while hypertension and current smoking were independently related to advanced and non-advanced adenomatous polyps, respectively. Conclusions: Diabetes, but not pre-diabetes, was associated with a higher risk of advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, both diabetes and pre-diabetes were important correlates of non-advanced adenomatous polyps.

AB - Background: While diabetes is considered as a risk factor for colorectal cancer, there are few studies that address the association between glycemic statuses and different colon polyps, ranging from non-neoplastic polyps to advanced adenomatous polyps. Methods: A total of 6,348 participants, consisting of 3,777 men and 2,571 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years, were included for final analysis after excluding subjects with a past history of colorectal cancer, colon polyps/polypectomy, familial adenomatous polyposis, and colorectomy, or missing data. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were defined using the 2011 American Diabetes Association criteria. Subjects were classified into four groups: polyp-free, non-neoplastic polyps, non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes among groups with different kinds of colon polyps. In addition, significant differences were also noted in age, total cholesterol, body mass index, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, and the prevalence of male gender, hypertension, obesity, current smoking and alcohol drinking among groups. In the multinomial logistic regression analyses, diabetes was related to both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while pre-diabetes was only related to non-advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, age ≥65 years and male gender were associated with both non-advanced and advanced adenomatous polyps, while hypertension and current smoking were independently related to advanced and non-advanced adenomatous polyps, respectively. Conclusions: Diabetes, but not pre-diabetes, was associated with a higher risk of advanced adenomatous polyps. In addition, both diabetes and pre-diabetes were important correlates of non-advanced adenomatous polyps.

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