The Relationships among Gender, Cognitive Styles, Learning Strategies, and Learning Performance in the Flipped Classroom

Yuh Tyng Chen, Shyh-Nan Liou, Lin Fan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study re-designed the classroom activities with consideration to interactions between human factors, such as gender and cognitive style, to technology as well as human-to-human interactions in the flipped classroom and explored their interrelationships. Sixty-two first-year college students of a Packaged Software and Application course were divided into two groups. The experimental group (N = 29) employed the revised flipped classroom format, while the conventional flipped classroom model was used with the control group (N = 27). Research data were obtained via pre-class quizzes, final grades, a learning satisfaction questionnaire, and interviews. The results led to the following conclusions: (1) Cognitive style and learning strategy significantly affected students’ learning performance and satisfaction in both the flipped and revised flipped classrooms. (2) The interactive video, peer-learning, and social management issues associated with group work may motivate students’ self-regulation. The implications of these results for the design of the flipped classroom are discussed in detail.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-403
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Human-Computer Interaction
Volume35
Issue number4-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar 16

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learning performance
learning strategy
Students
classroom
gender
Human engineering
social management
Group
student
quiz
group work
interaction
self-regulation
learning
video
questionnaire
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

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The Relationships among Gender, Cognitive Styles, Learning Strategies, and Learning Performance in the Flipped Classroom. / Chen, Yuh Tyng; Liou, Shyh-Nan; Chen, Lin Fan.

In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 35, No. 4-5, 16.03.2019, p. 395-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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