The risk of injury in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: A nationwide, matched-cohort, population-based study in Taiwan

Wu Chien Chien, Chi Hsiang Chung, Fu Huang Lin, Chin Bin Yeh, San Yuan Huang, Ru Band Lu, Hsin An Chang, Yu Chen Kao, Wei Shan Chiang, Yu Ching Chou, Chang Huei Tsao, Yung Fu Wu, Nian Sheng Tzeng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Few studies have investigated the risk of injuries associated with adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), even though several studies have suggested a higher risk of injury in children and adolescents with ADHD. Aims To investigate the risk of injury in adults with ADHD. Methods and procedures We included 665 adults with ADHD from January 1, to December 31, 2000, and 1995 sex-, age- and index day-matched controls without ADHD from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID) subset of the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze the associations between the relevant demographics, and the psychiatric comorbidities and the risk of injury. Outcomes and results The patients with ADHD had a 143% increased risk of overall injuries than the controls after considering all the confounding factors. In addition, the use of methylphenidate was associated with a 22.6% decrease in the risk of injuries in the patients with ADHD. Conclusions and implications Our findings strongly support that adults with ADHD are at an increased risk of injury, and imply that methylphenidate therapy may attenuate this risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-73
Number of pages17
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The risk of injury in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: A nationwide, matched-cohort, population-based study in Taiwan'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this