Time-moving metaphors and ego-moving metaphors: Which is better comprehended by Taiwanese?

Hsin Mei Huang May, Ching Yu Hsieh Shelley

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a semantic pilot study which concentrates on how people in Taiwan process the temporal metaphors, ego-moving metaphor and time-moving metaphor. Motivated by the research of Gentner, Imai, and Boroditsky (2002) in which the English native speakers comprehend ego-moving metaphors faster than time-moving metaphors, the present study attempts to reexamine whether the faster reaction to ego-moving metaphors is shared by both the Chinese native speakers and EFL learners. To achieve the goals, 25 Chinese/English bilinguals are invited to be examined via the16 Chinese and 16 English test sentences. The recordings of their accuracy on each item are served as the databases used to compare with the study of Gentner, Imai, and Boroditsky (2002). The two finding presented here are: (1) when the subjects tested in their native language, Chinese, they process ego-moving metaphors better. (2) when tested in the foreign language, English, they conceptualize time-moving metaphors much better.

Original languageEnglish
Pages173-181
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Dec 1
Event21st Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation, PACLIC 21 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 2007 Nov 12007 Nov 3

Other

Other21st Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation, PACLIC 21
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period07-11-0107-11-03

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Linguistics and Language

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    May, H. M. H., & Shelley, C. Y. H. (2007). Time-moving metaphors and ego-moving metaphors: Which is better comprehended by Taiwanese?. 173-181. Paper presented at 21st Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation, PACLIC 21, Seoul, Korea, Republic of.