Topographical disorientation in a patient with late-onset blindness with multiple acute ischemic brain lesions

Yu Hsuan Han, Ming Chyi Pai, Chi Tzong Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The neurological basis for topographical disorientation has recently shifted from a model of navigation utilizing egocentric techniques alone, to multiple parallel systems of topographical cognition including egocentric and allocentric strategies. We explored if this hypothesis may be applicable to a patient with late-onset blindness. A 72-year-old male with bilateral blindness experienced a sudden inability to navigate after suffering a stroke. Multiple lesions scattered bilaterally throughout the parietal-occipital lobes were found. Deficits in the neural correlates underlying egocentric or allocentric strategies may result in topographical disorientation, even if one appears to be the predominant orientation strategy utilized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-285
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Feb 1

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Confusion
Blindness
Occipital Lobe
Parietal Lobe
Brain
Cognition
Stroke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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Topographical disorientation in a patient with late-onset blindness with multiple acute ischemic brain lesions. / Han, Yu Hsuan; Pai, Ming Chyi; Hong, Chi Tzong.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 283-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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