Using Kano model to differentiate between future vehicle-driving services

Min-Yuan Ma, Chun Wei Chen, Yu Ming Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Services are constantly changing with the introduction of new technologies, which affect the service systems of both conventional and autonomous driving. New theories and technologies are also key factors affecting the design and development trends of service models and solutions. Major automobile manufacturers aspire to provide customers with unique services and experiences, resulting in a growing demand for systematic approaches to characterize customer behaviors and scientific methods to accurately interpret data stored in databases. This study proposes a scientific engineering and operation framework for driving services that enables conventional automobile manufacturers to re-evaluate their service models and solutions as they expand into the domain of autonomous driving, integrating customized consumer interactions and mass production efficiency to develop new technologies, and subsequently applying these technologies to innovate their driving services, form service innovation guidelines, and accelerate the development of smart applications for the automobile industry. A Kano two-dimensional model of quality was employed. A Kano questionnaire was administered to analyze consumers' perceived satisfaction concerning different service quality elements; the elements were then ranked in the order of requiring improvement to determine the elements that are essential in conventional vehicles. Finally, suggestions were proposed for improving the service quality of driving products and evaluating driver satisfaction. A total of 56 valid questionnaires were collected from potential buyers of four-door sedans. The questionnaire evaluated respondents’ perceived value and satisfaction of 30 product elements categorized into two groups (specific functions and intangible value-added services) across eight major quality dimensions (basic safety functions, multimedia entertainment systems, information and communication systems, value-added systems, active matching, automatic service systems, hardware–software integration, and customer service and support). In addition, Kano quality categories were statistically analyzed to elucidate whether significant differences existed between groups. Using the Kano quality categories, 30 design elements were classified: 10 as “attractive,” 7 as “one-dimensional,” 3 as “must-be,” 4 as “indifferent,” and 6 as “reverse.” Enterprises can effectively reduce customer dissatisfaction and enhance customer satisfaction based on the quality category of the product and the product improvement order proposed in this study. Relevance to industry: This study determined that using the Kano quality categories, enterprises can effectively reduce customer dissatisfaction and enhance customer satisfaction based on the quality category of the product and the product improvement order proposed in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-152
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
Volume69
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Automobiles
Technology
Customer satisfaction
customer
Industry
Systems Integration
Multimedia systems
Multimedia
Automotive industry
Information Systems
Quality of service
Communication systems
Information systems
Innovation
Communication
Databases
Guidelines
Safety
value added
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Using Kano model to differentiate between future vehicle-driving services",
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Using Kano model to differentiate between future vehicle-driving services. / Ma, Min-Yuan; Chen, Chun Wei; Chang, Yu Ming.

In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Vol. 69, 01.01.2019, p. 142-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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