Using the balanced scorecard on supply chain integration performance-a case study of service businesses

Hsin-Hsin Chang, Chung-Jye Hung, Kit Hong Wong, Chin Ho Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Supply chains are indispensable to corporations that seek to serve suppliers and customers better, to boost organization performance, to strengthen competitiveness, and to achieve continuous success. Currently, corporations place great emphasis on both supply chains and on balanced scorecards (BSCs) to develop effective measures to evaluate firm performance. This study discusses the integration of supply chain and performance based on the BSC measures developed by Kaplan and Norton (Harv Bus Rev 71(5):134-147, 1993; Harv Bus Rev 74(1):75-85, 1996) and Brewer and Speh (J Bus Logist 21(1): 79-93, 2000). The research applies case studies and a conceptual framework, modifying propositions accordingly. The main objectives of this study are to discuss the construction and implementation of supply chains, to determine how to handle supply chain barriers and to evaluate supply chain integration performance using the idea of a BSC. Companies at different levels in the supply chain are better served by assigning different levels of importance to different types of integration. Case studies show that supply chain integration involves supplier, internal, and customer barriers. The results of these studies have suggested that integrated supply chains can be dominated by one controlling member, which can be located either upstream or downstream in the chain. A new finding in this study is that varying degrees of supply chain integration are obtained due to corporations' different positions in an industry. The study provides some insights for firms in the process of implementing a supply chain management system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-561
Number of pages23
JournalService Business
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Dec 1

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Balanced score card
Service business
Supply chain integration
Supply chain
Bus
Suppliers
Integrated supply chain
Supply chain management
Competitiveness
Case study research
Industry
Organizational performance
Conceptual framework
Firm performance
Management system

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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Using the balanced scorecard on supply chain integration performance-a case study of service businesses. / Chang, Hsin-Hsin; Hung, Chung-Jye; Wong, Kit Hong; Lee, Chin Ho.

In: Service Business, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.12.2013, p. 539-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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