Value added or tunneling? Evidence from new product announcements by Taiwanese business groups

Shao Chi Chang, I. Fen Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using new product announcement events made by group member firms in Taiwan, this study examines whether the firms' multiple network ties within business groups benefit member firms or whether they provide a channel for controlling shareholders to tunnel. We find that the announcement of new products by group member firms has a positive effect on the market value of other, non-announcing group peers. This evidence is consistent with the value-added hypothesis. More importantly, this effect is stronger when member firms are connected via equity ties. Furthermore, we also offer an original analysis of how family control in business groups affects the impact of network ties on value creation. Our results suggest that the controlling family may discount the market value of member firms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)623-641
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Management and Organization
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Value added
Business groups
Announcement
New products
Market value
Equity
Peer group
Family control
Controlling shareholders
Taiwan
Value creation
Discount

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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Value added or tunneling? Evidence from new product announcements by Taiwanese business groups. / Chang, Shao Chi; Chen, I. Fen.

In: Journal of Management and Organization, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.09.2016, p. 623-641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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