Voltammetric approach for in-vivo detecting dopamine level of rat's brain

G. C. Chen, H. Z. Han, T. C. Tsai, C. C. Cheng, J. J. Jason Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by insufficient release of dopamine (DA). Knowing the DA level of animal's brain could provide a direct evidence for evaluating novel treatments for PD, especially in the acute or long-term studies. In this study, we used nanogold particle surface modified platinum electrodes to measure DA using cyclic voltammetry and amperometry technique for in-vitro DA sensing. For in-vivo study, deep brain stimulation (DBS) was applied to increase DA release as a validation step for in-vivo DA detection using amperometry technique. For the future application of in-vivo DA sensing in freely moving animal, miniaturization of the system which can be incorporated to a radio frequency transmitter is essential. Our ultimate goal is to apply the wireless miniature DA sensing unit for in-vivo DA recording as a direct evident and evaluation tool for novel treatment such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment for PD animal study.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication5th Kuala Lumpur International Conference on Biomedical Engineering 2011, BIOMED 2011
Pages367-370
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jul 11
Event5th Kuala Lumpur International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, BIOMED 2011, Held in Conjunction with the 8th Asian Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, APCMBE 2011 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Duration: 2011 Jun 202011 Jun 23

Publication series

NameIFMBE Proceedings
Volume35 IFMBE
ISSN (Print)1680-0737

Other

Other5th Kuala Lumpur International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, BIOMED 2011, Held in Conjunction with the 8th Asian Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, APCMBE 2011
CountryMalaysia
CityKuala Lumpur
Period11-06-2011-06-23

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

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