When the voluntary mind meets the irresistible event: Stimulus-response correspondence effects on task selection during voluntary task switching

Poyu Chen, Shulan Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study, we investigated how task selection is biased by inherent stimulus characteristics in the voluntary task-switching paradigm. We used digits as the task stimuli, since they may automatically induce spatially horizontal representations of numbers. Specifically, we examined whether an irrelevant spatial representation of a number coincides with its associated response codes and whether such a stimulus-response (S-R) correspondence effect biases task selection for a digit. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two different action code layout conditions: Two numerical tasks were arranged as inner/outer in the horizontal layout condition or as upper/down in the vertical layout condition. Participants in the horizontal layout condition were more likely to choose a task when the task's action code and the digit's spatial representation corresponded, as compared with when they did not. On the other hand, no selection bias was observed in the vertical layout condition, since there was no overlapping spatial representation between the stimulus and response. The present study extends previous findings by considering the influence of the stimulus-driven effect on task selection with regard to the S-R correspondence effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1195-1205
Number of pages11
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Dec 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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