Where you go reveals who you know: Analyzing social ties from millions of footprints

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper aims to investigate how the geographical footprints of users correlate to their social ties. While conventional wisdom told us that the more frequently two users co-locate in geography, the higher probability they are friends, we find that in real geo-social data, Gowalla and Meetup, almost all of the user pairs with friendships had never met geographically. In this sense, can we discover social ties among users purely using their geographical footprints even if they never met? To study this question, we develop a two-stage feature engineering framework. The first stage is to characterize the direct linkages between users through their spatial co-locations while the second is to capture the indirect linkages between them via a co-location graph. Experiments conducted on Gowalla check-in data and Meetup meeting events exhibit not only the superiority of our feature model, but also validate the predictability (with 70% accuracy) of detecting social ties solely from user footprints.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCIKM 2015 - Proceedings of the 24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages1839-1842
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781450337946
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Oct 17
Event24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, CIKM 2015 - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 2015 Oct 192015 Oct 23

Publication series

NameInternational Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings
Volume19-23-Oct-2015

Other

Other24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, CIKM 2015
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period15-10-1915-10-23

Fingerprint

Social ties
Co-location
Linkage
Experiment
Correlates
Graph
Friendship
Geography
Predictability
Wisdom

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Decision Sciences(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Hsieh, H. P., Yan, R., & Li, C. T. (2015). Where you go reveals who you know: Analyzing social ties from millions of footprints. In CIKM 2015 - Proceedings of the 24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management (pp. 1839-1842). (International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings; Vol. 19-23-Oct-2015). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2806416.2806653
Hsieh, Hsun Ping ; Yan, Rui ; Li, Cheng Te. / Where you go reveals who you know : Analyzing social ties from millions of footprints. CIKM 2015 - Proceedings of the 24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management. Association for Computing Machinery, 2015. pp. 1839-1842 (International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings).
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Hsieh, HP, Yan, R & Li, CT 2015, Where you go reveals who you know: Analyzing social ties from millions of footprints. in CIKM 2015 - Proceedings of the 24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management. International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings, vol. 19-23-Oct-2015, Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 1839-1842, 24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, CIKM 2015, Melbourne, Australia, 15-10-19. https://doi.org/10.1145/2806416.2806653

Where you go reveals who you know : Analyzing social ties from millions of footprints. / Hsieh, Hsun Ping; Yan, Rui; Li, Cheng Te.

CIKM 2015 - Proceedings of the 24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management. Association for Computing Machinery, 2015. p. 1839-1842 (International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings; Vol. 19-23-Oct-2015).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Hsieh HP, Yan R, Li CT. Where you go reveals who you know: Analyzing social ties from millions of footprints. In CIKM 2015 - Proceedings of the 24th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management. Association for Computing Machinery. 2015. p. 1839-1842. (International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1145/2806416.2806653