Will daytime occupational noise exposures induce nighttime sleep disturbance?

Cheng-Yu Lin, Peng-Chi Tsai, Kuei Yi Lin, Chih Yong Chen, Lin Hui Chung, Jiunn-Liang Wu, Yueliang Leon Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Nighttime environmental noise affects sleep quality. However, the effects of daytime occupational noise remain unclear. Methods: A quasi-experiment of 48 participants who had been employed for at least six months in two hospital cafeterias. The participants were randomly designated to be assessed on high- and low-noise workdays for 8 h or low- and high-noise workdays, separated by a washout period of 14 days. Subsequently, pure tone audiometry, autonomic nervous system (ANS) function tests, serum cortisol tests, and polysomnography were conducted. Results: For the 40 participants in the study, the 8-h time-weighted average of personal noise exposed on high- and low-noise workdays was 76.8 dBA (standard deviation, SD: 6.2) and 61.0 dBA (SD: 7.1), respectively. Participants with higher personal noise exposure during the day were found to have a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (percent change of mean value: −1.287%; 95% CI: −2.602%, −0.037%) and lower sleep efficiency (−0.267%; 95% CI: −0.525%, −0.008%). In addition, after work, personal noise exposure was revealed to be related to increased serum cortisol levels (1.698%; 95% CI: 0.887%, 2.528%), and sympathetic activity as measured by low frequency/high frequency (3.000%; 95% CI: 1.294%, 4.706%) and blood pressures by cold pressor test (systolic: 5.163%; 95% CI: 2.780%, 7.537%) (diastolic: 3.109%; 95% CI: 1.604%, 4.614%). Conclusions: Daytime occupational noise exposure had sustained effects on nighttime sleep quality, specifically on slow wave sleep and sleep efficiency. These disturbances could be partially explained by post-shift elevated cortisol and ANS activity. The psychosocial and metabolic consequences of poorer sleep quality induced by occupational noise exposure warrant further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-96
Number of pages10
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct 1

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Occupational Noise
Occupational Exposure
Noise
Sleep
Hydrocortisone
Autonomic Nervous System
Pure-Tone Audiometry
Polysomnography
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lin, Cheng-Yu ; Tsai, Peng-Chi ; Lin, Kuei Yi ; Chen, Chih Yong ; Chung, Lin Hui ; Wu, Jiunn-Liang ; Guo, Yueliang Leon. / Will daytime occupational noise exposures induce nighttime sleep disturbance?. In: Sleep Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 50. pp. 87-96.
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title = "Will daytime occupational noise exposures induce nighttime sleep disturbance?",
abstract = "Background: Nighttime environmental noise affects sleep quality. However, the effects of daytime occupational noise remain unclear. Methods: A quasi-experiment of 48 participants who had been employed for at least six months in two hospital cafeterias. The participants were randomly designated to be assessed on high- and low-noise workdays for 8 h or low- and high-noise workdays, separated by a washout period of 14 days. Subsequently, pure tone audiometry, autonomic nervous system (ANS) function tests, serum cortisol tests, and polysomnography were conducted. Results: For the 40 participants in the study, the 8-h time-weighted average of personal noise exposed on high- and low-noise workdays was 76.8 dBA (standard deviation, SD: 6.2) and 61.0 dBA (SD: 7.1), respectively. Participants with higher personal noise exposure during the day were found to have a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (percent change of mean value: −1.287{\%}; 95{\%} CI: −2.602{\%}, −0.037{\%}) and lower sleep efficiency (−0.267{\%}; 95{\%} CI: −0.525{\%}, −0.008{\%}). In addition, after work, personal noise exposure was revealed to be related to increased serum cortisol levels (1.698{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 0.887{\%}, 2.528{\%}), and sympathetic activity as measured by low frequency/high frequency (3.000{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 1.294{\%}, 4.706{\%}) and blood pressures by cold pressor test (systolic: 5.163{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 2.780{\%}, 7.537{\%}) (diastolic: 3.109{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 1.604{\%}, 4.614{\%}). Conclusions: Daytime occupational noise exposure had sustained effects on nighttime sleep quality, specifically on slow wave sleep and sleep efficiency. These disturbances could be partially explained by post-shift elevated cortisol and ANS activity. The psychosocial and metabolic consequences of poorer sleep quality induced by occupational noise exposure warrant further investigation.",
author = "Cheng-Yu Lin and Peng-Chi Tsai and Lin, {Kuei Yi} and Chen, {Chih Yong} and Chung, {Lin Hui} and Jiunn-Liang Wu and Guo, {Yueliang Leon}",
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Will daytime occupational noise exposures induce nighttime sleep disturbance? / Lin, Cheng-Yu; Tsai, Peng-Chi; Lin, Kuei Yi; Chen, Chih Yong; Chung, Lin Hui; Wu, Jiunn-Liang; Guo, Yueliang Leon.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 50, 01.10.2018, p. 87-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Will daytime occupational noise exposures induce nighttime sleep disturbance?

AU - Lin, Cheng-Yu

AU - Tsai, Peng-Chi

AU - Lin, Kuei Yi

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AU - Guo, Yueliang Leon

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N2 - Background: Nighttime environmental noise affects sleep quality. However, the effects of daytime occupational noise remain unclear. Methods: A quasi-experiment of 48 participants who had been employed for at least six months in two hospital cafeterias. The participants were randomly designated to be assessed on high- and low-noise workdays for 8 h or low- and high-noise workdays, separated by a washout period of 14 days. Subsequently, pure tone audiometry, autonomic nervous system (ANS) function tests, serum cortisol tests, and polysomnography were conducted. Results: For the 40 participants in the study, the 8-h time-weighted average of personal noise exposed on high- and low-noise workdays was 76.8 dBA (standard deviation, SD: 6.2) and 61.0 dBA (SD: 7.1), respectively. Participants with higher personal noise exposure during the day were found to have a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (percent change of mean value: −1.287%; 95% CI: −2.602%, −0.037%) and lower sleep efficiency (−0.267%; 95% CI: −0.525%, −0.008%). In addition, after work, personal noise exposure was revealed to be related to increased serum cortisol levels (1.698%; 95% CI: 0.887%, 2.528%), and sympathetic activity as measured by low frequency/high frequency (3.000%; 95% CI: 1.294%, 4.706%) and blood pressures by cold pressor test (systolic: 5.163%; 95% CI: 2.780%, 7.537%) (diastolic: 3.109%; 95% CI: 1.604%, 4.614%). Conclusions: Daytime occupational noise exposure had sustained effects on nighttime sleep quality, specifically on slow wave sleep and sleep efficiency. These disturbances could be partially explained by post-shift elevated cortisol and ANS activity. The psychosocial and metabolic consequences of poorer sleep quality induced by occupational noise exposure warrant further investigation.

AB - Background: Nighttime environmental noise affects sleep quality. However, the effects of daytime occupational noise remain unclear. Methods: A quasi-experiment of 48 participants who had been employed for at least six months in two hospital cafeterias. The participants were randomly designated to be assessed on high- and low-noise workdays for 8 h or low- and high-noise workdays, separated by a washout period of 14 days. Subsequently, pure tone audiometry, autonomic nervous system (ANS) function tests, serum cortisol tests, and polysomnography were conducted. Results: For the 40 participants in the study, the 8-h time-weighted average of personal noise exposed on high- and low-noise workdays was 76.8 dBA (standard deviation, SD: 6.2) and 61.0 dBA (SD: 7.1), respectively. Participants with higher personal noise exposure during the day were found to have a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (percent change of mean value: −1.287%; 95% CI: −2.602%, −0.037%) and lower sleep efficiency (−0.267%; 95% CI: −0.525%, −0.008%). In addition, after work, personal noise exposure was revealed to be related to increased serum cortisol levels (1.698%; 95% CI: 0.887%, 2.528%), and sympathetic activity as measured by low frequency/high frequency (3.000%; 95% CI: 1.294%, 4.706%) and blood pressures by cold pressor test (systolic: 5.163%; 95% CI: 2.780%, 7.537%) (diastolic: 3.109%; 95% CI: 1.604%, 4.614%). Conclusions: Daytime occupational noise exposure had sustained effects on nighttime sleep quality, specifically on slow wave sleep and sleep efficiency. These disturbances could be partially explained by post-shift elevated cortisol and ANS activity. The psychosocial and metabolic consequences of poorer sleep quality induced by occupational noise exposure warrant further investigation.

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