The Antecedents of Social Approval Goals and Their Impact on Depression

  • 穎 黃

Student thesis: Master's Thesis

Abstract

Social academic goals are important in explaining students’ achievement motivation and thus has substantial educational applications. The aim of this study was to construct models to examine how adolescents’ social approval goals were affected by parent involvement (parental care, joint decision making), and how were related to three dimensions of depression (body symptoms, depressed mood, agitation) along with autonomy need. Structure equation modeling was used to analyze national data of 7th and 9th graders, respectively, from the first wave of ‘The Taiwan Youth Project’. Results indicated that for the 7th graders, both father care and joint decision making with mother can positively predict social approval goals. Social approval goals can negatively predict body symptoms, depressed mood and agitation, while autonomy need can positively predict depressed mood. For the 9th graders, both mother care and father care can positively predict social approval goals, but joint decision making had no significant prediction. Similar to the 7th graders, social approval goals can negatively predict three dimensions of depression. Autonomy need can positively predict depressed mood and agitation. However, the moderation role of autonomy need was not significant in either 7th or 9th graders. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Date of Award2016
Original languageEnglish
Supervisor偉明 陸 (Supervisor)

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