Clinical Features of Children Infected with Different Strains of Influenza B in Southern Taiwan

Chia Yu Chi, Shih-Min Wang, Chia Chun Lin, Hsuan Chen Wang, Jen-Ren Wang, Ih Jen Su, Ching-Chuan Liu

研究成果: Article

35 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: This study was designed to determine the clinical characteristics of children infected with different strains of influenza B viruses isolated in southern Taiwan. The clinical features were compared with influenza A infection occurring in the same period. Methods: All children enrolled in the study had laboratory-confirmed infection with influenza A or B viruses. Influenza B speciation was performed by RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Demographic data, clinical findings, diagnoses, and outcomes were obtained. Results: During the study period, 163 strains of influenza A and 118 strains of influenza B were isolated. The Yamagata-like strains were most prevalent in 2001. New reassortant strains were identified since 2002 and became predominant in 2005 and 2006. Children with influenza B were more likely than those with influenza A to be diagnosed as upper respiratory tract infection, myositis, and gastroenteritis (P < 0.05). Children infected with Yamagata-like strains were more likely to develop lower respiratory tract infection (P < 0.05) and accounted for all cases of invasive disease. Children infected with the Victoria-like group had the longest hospital stays associated with severe bacterial superinfection. Conclusions: Currently new reassortant influenza B viruses are the predominant strains circulating in southern Taiwan. There is considerable similarity of clinical features between influenza A and B in children. The Yamagata-like strains were associated with more invasive infections. Continuous influenza virus surveillance is essential particularly in Taiwan where pandemic strains tend to appear earlier than in other countries.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)640-645
頁數6
期刊Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
27
發行號7
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2008 一月 1

指紋

Taiwan
Human Influenza
Influenza B virus
Respiratory Tract Infections
Reassortant Viruses
Laboratory Infection
Superinfection
Myositis
Victoria
Influenza A virus
Gastroenteritis
Pandemics
Infection
Orthomyxoviridae
Length of Stay
Complementary DNA
Demography
RNA
Polymerase Chain Reaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

引用此文

@article{0fdd314091c849fd8dcb5108d724bd53,
title = "Clinical Features of Children Infected with Different Strains of Influenza B in Southern Taiwan",
abstract = "Background: This study was designed to determine the clinical characteristics of children infected with different strains of influenza B viruses isolated in southern Taiwan. The clinical features were compared with influenza A infection occurring in the same period. Methods: All children enrolled in the study had laboratory-confirmed infection with influenza A or B viruses. Influenza B speciation was performed by RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Demographic data, clinical findings, diagnoses, and outcomes were obtained. Results: During the study period, 163 strains of influenza A and 118 strains of influenza B were isolated. The Yamagata-like strains were most prevalent in 2001. New reassortant strains were identified since 2002 and became predominant in 2005 and 2006. Children with influenza B were more likely than those with influenza A to be diagnosed as upper respiratory tract infection, myositis, and gastroenteritis (P < 0.05). Children infected with Yamagata-like strains were more likely to develop lower respiratory tract infection (P < 0.05) and accounted for all cases of invasive disease. Children infected with the Victoria-like group had the longest hospital stays associated with severe bacterial superinfection. Conclusions: Currently new reassortant influenza B viruses are the predominant strains circulating in southern Taiwan. There is considerable similarity of clinical features between influenza A and B in children. The Yamagata-like strains were associated with more invasive infections. Continuous influenza virus surveillance is essential particularly in Taiwan where pandemic strains tend to appear earlier than in other countries.",
author = "Chi, {Chia Yu} and Shih-Min Wang and Lin, {Chia Chun} and Wang, {Hsuan Chen} and Jen-Ren Wang and Su, {Ih Jen} and Ching-Chuan Liu",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/INF.0b013e31816be008",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "640--645",
journal = "Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal",
issn = "0891-3668",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

Clinical Features of Children Infected with Different Strains of Influenza B in Southern Taiwan. / Chi, Chia Yu; Wang, Shih-Min; Lin, Chia Chun; Wang, Hsuan Chen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Su, Ih Jen; Liu, Ching-Chuan.

於: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 卷 27, 編號 7, 01.01.2008, p. 640-645.

研究成果: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical Features of Children Infected with Different Strains of Influenza B in Southern Taiwan

AU - Chi, Chia Yu

AU - Wang, Shih-Min

AU - Lin, Chia Chun

AU - Wang, Hsuan Chen

AU - Wang, Jen-Ren

AU - Su, Ih Jen

AU - Liu, Ching-Chuan

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Background: This study was designed to determine the clinical characteristics of children infected with different strains of influenza B viruses isolated in southern Taiwan. The clinical features were compared with influenza A infection occurring in the same period. Methods: All children enrolled in the study had laboratory-confirmed infection with influenza A or B viruses. Influenza B speciation was performed by RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Demographic data, clinical findings, diagnoses, and outcomes were obtained. Results: During the study period, 163 strains of influenza A and 118 strains of influenza B were isolated. The Yamagata-like strains were most prevalent in 2001. New reassortant strains were identified since 2002 and became predominant in 2005 and 2006. Children with influenza B were more likely than those with influenza A to be diagnosed as upper respiratory tract infection, myositis, and gastroenteritis (P < 0.05). Children infected with Yamagata-like strains were more likely to develop lower respiratory tract infection (P < 0.05) and accounted for all cases of invasive disease. Children infected with the Victoria-like group had the longest hospital stays associated with severe bacterial superinfection. Conclusions: Currently new reassortant influenza B viruses are the predominant strains circulating in southern Taiwan. There is considerable similarity of clinical features between influenza A and B in children. The Yamagata-like strains were associated with more invasive infections. Continuous influenza virus surveillance is essential particularly in Taiwan where pandemic strains tend to appear earlier than in other countries.

AB - Background: This study was designed to determine the clinical characteristics of children infected with different strains of influenza B viruses isolated in southern Taiwan. The clinical features were compared with influenza A infection occurring in the same period. Methods: All children enrolled in the study had laboratory-confirmed infection with influenza A or B viruses. Influenza B speciation was performed by RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Demographic data, clinical findings, diagnoses, and outcomes were obtained. Results: During the study period, 163 strains of influenza A and 118 strains of influenza B were isolated. The Yamagata-like strains were most prevalent in 2001. New reassortant strains were identified since 2002 and became predominant in 2005 and 2006. Children with influenza B were more likely than those with influenza A to be diagnosed as upper respiratory tract infection, myositis, and gastroenteritis (P < 0.05). Children infected with Yamagata-like strains were more likely to develop lower respiratory tract infection (P < 0.05) and accounted for all cases of invasive disease. Children infected with the Victoria-like group had the longest hospital stays associated with severe bacterial superinfection. Conclusions: Currently new reassortant influenza B viruses are the predominant strains circulating in southern Taiwan. There is considerable similarity of clinical features between influenza A and B in children. The Yamagata-like strains were associated with more invasive infections. Continuous influenza virus surveillance is essential particularly in Taiwan where pandemic strains tend to appear earlier than in other countries.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=50949114784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=50949114784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/INF.0b013e31816be008

DO - 10.1097/INF.0b013e31816be008

M3 - Article

C2 - 18520968

AN - SCOPUS:50949114784

VL - 27

SP - 640

EP - 645

JO - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

JF - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

SN - 0891-3668

IS - 7

ER -