Complications of varicella infection in children in southern Taiwan

A. Yu Chi, Shih-Min Wang, Hui Chen Lin, Ching-Chuan Liu

研究成果: Article

12 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background and Purpose: This study was designed to compare the change in complications of varicella infection in children requiring hospitalization before and after varicella vaccine introduction at a tertiary care hospital in southern Taiwan. Methods: Based on the results of a retrospective study conducted in the pre-vaccine era (1988-1998), a second study was carried out from 1998-2004 (post-vaccine era). In children admitted for varicella-related complications, demographic data, clinical features, microbiological findings, and outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results: A decreased annual rate of hospitalization was observed between the two eras. Age-specific hospitalization rates significantly declined in the age group of 1-10 years after vaccine introduction. Secondary skin or soft tissue infections were the most common complications in both periods (pre-vaccine era, 44.1%; post-vaccine introduced era, 56.6%). In the post-vaccine era, 23 (52%) patients had positive bacterial isolates, including 19 Staphylococcus aureus (12 oxacillin-sensitive, 7 oxacillin-resistant) and 4 coagulase-negative staphylococci; a higher rate of pneumonitis and lower rate of central nervous system involvement were also observed. No differences were observed in other complications between the two eras. In the post-vaccine era, hematological diseases were the most common underlying conditions (17/18, 94%). The case-fatality rate in the post-vaccine era (1.3%) was similar to that in the pre-vaccine era (2.2%). Conclusions: A universal childhood varicella vaccination program would ultimately prevent the spread and potential complications of varicella. The result of this study may serve as baseline information as the national vaccination program begins.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)402-407
頁數6
期刊Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection
39
發行號5
出版狀態Published - 2006 十月

指紋

Chickenpox
Taiwan
Vaccines
Infection
Oxacillin
Hospitalization
Vaccination
Chickenpox Vaccine
Soft Tissue Infections
Hematologic Diseases
Coagulase
Tertiary Healthcare
Staphylococcus
Tertiary Care Centers
Staphylococcus aureus
Pneumonia
Central Nervous System
Retrospective Studies
Age Groups
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

引用此文

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title = "Complications of varicella infection in children in southern Taiwan",
abstract = "Background and Purpose: This study was designed to compare the change in complications of varicella infection in children requiring hospitalization before and after varicella vaccine introduction at a tertiary care hospital in southern Taiwan. Methods: Based on the results of a retrospective study conducted in the pre-vaccine era (1988-1998), a second study was carried out from 1998-2004 (post-vaccine era). In children admitted for varicella-related complications, demographic data, clinical features, microbiological findings, and outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results: A decreased annual rate of hospitalization was observed between the two eras. Age-specific hospitalization rates significantly declined in the age group of 1-10 years after vaccine introduction. Secondary skin or soft tissue infections were the most common complications in both periods (pre-vaccine era, 44.1{\%}; post-vaccine introduced era, 56.6{\%}). In the post-vaccine era, 23 (52{\%}) patients had positive bacterial isolates, including 19 Staphylococcus aureus (12 oxacillin-sensitive, 7 oxacillin-resistant) and 4 coagulase-negative staphylococci; a higher rate of pneumonitis and lower rate of central nervous system involvement were also observed. No differences were observed in other complications between the two eras. In the post-vaccine era, hematological diseases were the most common underlying conditions (17/18, 94{\%}). The case-fatality rate in the post-vaccine era (1.3{\%}) was similar to that in the pre-vaccine era (2.2{\%}). Conclusions: A universal childhood varicella vaccination program would ultimately prevent the spread and potential complications of varicella. The result of this study may serve as baseline information as the national vaccination program begins.",
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AU - Lin, Hui Chen

AU - Liu, Ching-Chuan

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N2 - Background and Purpose: This study was designed to compare the change in complications of varicella infection in children requiring hospitalization before and after varicella vaccine introduction at a tertiary care hospital in southern Taiwan. Methods: Based on the results of a retrospective study conducted in the pre-vaccine era (1988-1998), a second study was carried out from 1998-2004 (post-vaccine era). In children admitted for varicella-related complications, demographic data, clinical features, microbiological findings, and outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results: A decreased annual rate of hospitalization was observed between the two eras. Age-specific hospitalization rates significantly declined in the age group of 1-10 years after vaccine introduction. Secondary skin or soft tissue infections were the most common complications in both periods (pre-vaccine era, 44.1%; post-vaccine introduced era, 56.6%). In the post-vaccine era, 23 (52%) patients had positive bacterial isolates, including 19 Staphylococcus aureus (12 oxacillin-sensitive, 7 oxacillin-resistant) and 4 coagulase-negative staphylococci; a higher rate of pneumonitis and lower rate of central nervous system involvement were also observed. No differences were observed in other complications between the two eras. In the post-vaccine era, hematological diseases were the most common underlying conditions (17/18, 94%). The case-fatality rate in the post-vaccine era (1.3%) was similar to that in the pre-vaccine era (2.2%). Conclusions: A universal childhood varicella vaccination program would ultimately prevent the spread and potential complications of varicella. The result of this study may serve as baseline information as the national vaccination program begins.

AB - Background and Purpose: This study was designed to compare the change in complications of varicella infection in children requiring hospitalization before and after varicella vaccine introduction at a tertiary care hospital in southern Taiwan. Methods: Based on the results of a retrospective study conducted in the pre-vaccine era (1988-1998), a second study was carried out from 1998-2004 (post-vaccine era). In children admitted for varicella-related complications, demographic data, clinical features, microbiological findings, and outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results: A decreased annual rate of hospitalization was observed between the two eras. Age-specific hospitalization rates significantly declined in the age group of 1-10 years after vaccine introduction. Secondary skin or soft tissue infections were the most common complications in both periods (pre-vaccine era, 44.1%; post-vaccine introduced era, 56.6%). In the post-vaccine era, 23 (52%) patients had positive bacterial isolates, including 19 Staphylococcus aureus (12 oxacillin-sensitive, 7 oxacillin-resistant) and 4 coagulase-negative staphylococci; a higher rate of pneumonitis and lower rate of central nervous system involvement were also observed. No differences were observed in other complications between the two eras. In the post-vaccine era, hematological diseases were the most common underlying conditions (17/18, 94%). The case-fatality rate in the post-vaccine era (1.3%) was similar to that in the pre-vaccine era (2.2%). Conclusions: A universal childhood varicella vaccination program would ultimately prevent the spread and potential complications of varicella. The result of this study may serve as baseline information as the national vaccination program begins.

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