Cross-Cultural Differences of the Non-Motor Symptoms Studied by the Traditional Chinese Version of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society–Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale

Rwei Ling Yu, Ruey Meei Wu, Anne Y.Y. Chan, Vincent Mok, Yih Ru Wu, Barbara C. Tilley, Sheng Luo, Lu Wang, Nancy R. LaPelle, Glenn T. Stebbins, Christopher G. Goetz

研究成果: Article

7 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: Given the importance of ethnic differences in the evaluation of various aspects of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we present the formal procedure for completing the traditional Chinese translation of the International and Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society/UPDRS (MDS-UPDRS) and highlight the discrepancy in nonmotor symptoms (NMS) between patients in Eastern and Western countries. Methods: A total of 350 native Chinese-speaking PD patients were recruited from multiple hospitals in Eastern countries; they completed the MDS-UPDRS. The translation process was executed and factor analysis was performed to determine the structure of the scale. Chi-squared and t tests were used to compare frequency and severity of PD symptoms between the Chinese-speaking and English-speaking groups (n = 876). Results: NMS and motor symptoms were more severe in the Western population (Part I: t(1205) = 5.36, P < 0.0001; and Part III: t(1205) = 7.64, P < 0.0001); however, the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction and impairments in activities of daily living were more frequent in the Eastern patients. The comparative fit index was 0.93 or greater, and the exploratory factor analysis revealed compatible results between the translated scale and the original version. Conclusion: The traditional Chinese version of the MDS-UPDRS can be designated as an official translation of the original scale, and it is now available for use. Moreover, NMS in PD constitute a major issue worldwide, and the pattern of NMS among the Chinese population is more marked in terms of cognition-based symptoms and activities of daily living.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)68-77
頁數10
期刊Movement Disorders Clinical Practice
4
發行號1
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2017 一月 1

指紋

Movement Disorders
Parkinson Disease
Activities of Daily Living
Statistical Factor Analysis
Cognition
Population
Cognitive Dysfunction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

引用此文

Yu, Rwei Ling ; Wu, Ruey Meei ; Chan, Anne Y.Y. ; Mok, Vincent ; Wu, Yih Ru ; Tilley, Barbara C. ; Luo, Sheng ; Wang, Lu ; LaPelle, Nancy R. ; Stebbins, Glenn T. ; Goetz, Christopher G. / Cross-Cultural Differences of the Non-Motor Symptoms Studied by the Traditional Chinese Version of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society–Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. 於: Movement Disorders Clinical Practice. 2017 ; 卷 4, 編號 1. 頁 68-77.
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title = "Cross-Cultural Differences of the Non-Motor Symptoms Studied by the Traditional Chinese Version of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society–Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale",
abstract = "Background: Given the importance of ethnic differences in the evaluation of various aspects of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we present the formal procedure for completing the traditional Chinese translation of the International and Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society/UPDRS (MDS-UPDRS) and highlight the discrepancy in nonmotor symptoms (NMS) between patients in Eastern and Western countries. Methods: A total of 350 native Chinese-speaking PD patients were recruited from multiple hospitals in Eastern countries; they completed the MDS-UPDRS. The translation process was executed and factor analysis was performed to determine the structure of the scale. Chi-squared and t tests were used to compare frequency and severity of PD symptoms between the Chinese-speaking and English-speaking groups (n = 876). Results: NMS and motor symptoms were more severe in the Western population (Part I: t(1205) = 5.36, P < 0.0001; and Part III: t(1205) = 7.64, P < 0.0001); however, the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction and impairments in activities of daily living were more frequent in the Eastern patients. The comparative fit index was 0.93 or greater, and the exploratory factor analysis revealed compatible results between the translated scale and the original version. Conclusion: The traditional Chinese version of the MDS-UPDRS can be designated as an official translation of the original scale, and it is now available for use. Moreover, NMS in PD constitute a major issue worldwide, and the pattern of NMS among the Chinese population is more marked in terms of cognition-based symptoms and activities of daily living.",
author = "Yu, {Rwei Ling} and Wu, {Ruey Meei} and Chan, {Anne Y.Y.} and Vincent Mok and Wu, {Yih Ru} and Tilley, {Barbara C.} and Sheng Luo and Lu Wang and LaPelle, {Nancy R.} and Stebbins, {Glenn T.} and Goetz, {Christopher G.}",
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Cross-Cultural Differences of the Non-Motor Symptoms Studied by the Traditional Chinese Version of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society–Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. / Yu, Rwei Ling; Wu, Ruey Meei; Chan, Anne Y.Y.; Mok, Vincent; Wu, Yih Ru; Tilley, Barbara C.; Luo, Sheng; Wang, Lu; LaPelle, Nancy R.; Stebbins, Glenn T.; Goetz, Christopher G.

於: Movement Disorders Clinical Practice, 卷 4, 編號 1, 01.01.2017, p. 68-77.

研究成果: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross-Cultural Differences of the Non-Motor Symptoms Studied by the Traditional Chinese Version of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society–Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale

AU - Yu, Rwei Ling

AU - Wu, Ruey Meei

AU - Chan, Anne Y.Y.

AU - Mok, Vincent

AU - Wu, Yih Ru

AU - Tilley, Barbara C.

AU - Luo, Sheng

AU - Wang, Lu

AU - LaPelle, Nancy R.

AU - Stebbins, Glenn T.

AU - Goetz, Christopher G.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background: Given the importance of ethnic differences in the evaluation of various aspects of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we present the formal procedure for completing the traditional Chinese translation of the International and Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society/UPDRS (MDS-UPDRS) and highlight the discrepancy in nonmotor symptoms (NMS) between patients in Eastern and Western countries. Methods: A total of 350 native Chinese-speaking PD patients were recruited from multiple hospitals in Eastern countries; they completed the MDS-UPDRS. The translation process was executed and factor analysis was performed to determine the structure of the scale. Chi-squared and t tests were used to compare frequency and severity of PD symptoms between the Chinese-speaking and English-speaking groups (n = 876). Results: NMS and motor symptoms were more severe in the Western population (Part I: t(1205) = 5.36, P < 0.0001; and Part III: t(1205) = 7.64, P < 0.0001); however, the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction and impairments in activities of daily living were more frequent in the Eastern patients. The comparative fit index was 0.93 or greater, and the exploratory factor analysis revealed compatible results between the translated scale and the original version. Conclusion: The traditional Chinese version of the MDS-UPDRS can be designated as an official translation of the original scale, and it is now available for use. Moreover, NMS in PD constitute a major issue worldwide, and the pattern of NMS among the Chinese population is more marked in terms of cognition-based symptoms and activities of daily living.

AB - Background: Given the importance of ethnic differences in the evaluation of various aspects of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we present the formal procedure for completing the traditional Chinese translation of the International and Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society/UPDRS (MDS-UPDRS) and highlight the discrepancy in nonmotor symptoms (NMS) between patients in Eastern and Western countries. Methods: A total of 350 native Chinese-speaking PD patients were recruited from multiple hospitals in Eastern countries; they completed the MDS-UPDRS. The translation process was executed and factor analysis was performed to determine the structure of the scale. Chi-squared and t tests were used to compare frequency and severity of PD symptoms between the Chinese-speaking and English-speaking groups (n = 876). Results: NMS and motor symptoms were more severe in the Western population (Part I: t(1205) = 5.36, P < 0.0001; and Part III: t(1205) = 7.64, P < 0.0001); however, the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction and impairments in activities of daily living were more frequent in the Eastern patients. The comparative fit index was 0.93 or greater, and the exploratory factor analysis revealed compatible results between the translated scale and the original version. Conclusion: The traditional Chinese version of the MDS-UPDRS can be designated as an official translation of the original scale, and it is now available for use. Moreover, NMS in PD constitute a major issue worldwide, and the pattern of NMS among the Chinese population is more marked in terms of cognition-based symptoms and activities of daily living.

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