Diagnostic Dilemma in Discriminating Between Spinal Neurenteric Cysts and Simple Arachnoid Cysts Based on Embryogenesis and Surgical Correlation

研究成果: Article

摘要

Background: Neurenteric cyst (NEC) is a rare intradural spinal tumor, but a correct preoperative diagnosis remains challenging. A misdiagnosis of arachnoid cyst (AC) often leads to conflicting surgical management and significantly higher recurrence. Case Description: We report the case of a 26-year-old woman who presented with progressive spastic quadriparesis with myelopathy below the C4 level, which was caused by a ventral intradural extramedullary cystic tumor at the C3-4 level. Magnetic resonance images showed the cystic content as identical to cerebrospinal fluid, which prompted the tentative diagnosis of spinal AC. Surgical fenestration was scheduled. However, intraoperative findings of a thick-walled cyst and severe adhesion to the neural structure without a history of trauma and inflammation were more compatible with the pathogenesis of an NEC. Because of the high recurrence rate after an incomplete resection of an NEC, we did a complete resection of the cyst with adhesive rootlets instead. Pathology analysis and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of an endodermal-derived NEC. Conclusions: NECs must be differentiated from ACs because they are different diseases and require different surgical management. In cases with clear cystic content, however, the diagnosis is likely to be AC, but a thick cystic wall and structural adhesions should suggest the differential diagnosis of NEC. Gross total removal of NECs should be attempted to reduce NEC recurrence.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)489-494
頁數6
期刊World Neurosurgery
134
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2020 二月

指紋

Arachnoid Cysts
Neural Tube Defects
Embryonic Development
Recurrence
Cysts
Quadriplegia
Muscle Spasticity
Spinal Cord Diseases
Diagnostic Errors
Adhesives
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Neoplasms
Differential Diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Pathology
Staining and Labeling
Inflammation
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

引用此文

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title = "Diagnostic Dilemma in Discriminating Between Spinal Neurenteric Cysts and Simple Arachnoid Cysts Based on Embryogenesis and Surgical Correlation",
abstract = "Background: Neurenteric cyst (NEC) is a rare intradural spinal tumor, but a correct preoperative diagnosis remains challenging. A misdiagnosis of arachnoid cyst (AC) often leads to conflicting surgical management and significantly higher recurrence. Case Description: We report the case of a 26-year-old woman who presented with progressive spastic quadriparesis with myelopathy below the C4 level, which was caused by a ventral intradural extramedullary cystic tumor at the C3-4 level. Magnetic resonance images showed the cystic content as identical to cerebrospinal fluid, which prompted the tentative diagnosis of spinal AC. Surgical fenestration was scheduled. However, intraoperative findings of a thick-walled cyst and severe adhesion to the neural structure without a history of trauma and inflammation were more compatible with the pathogenesis of an NEC. Because of the high recurrence rate after an incomplete resection of an NEC, we did a complete resection of the cyst with adhesive rootlets instead. Pathology analysis and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of an endodermal-derived NEC. Conclusions: NECs must be differentiated from ACs because they are different diseases and require different surgical management. In cases with clear cystic content, however, the diagnosis is likely to be AC, but a thick cystic wall and structural adhesions should suggest the differential diagnosis of NEC. Gross total removal of NECs should be attempted to reduce NEC recurrence.",
author = "Chiang, {Liang Jui} and Wang, {Chien Kuo} and Tsai, {Hung Wen} and Lee, {Jung Shun}",
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T1 - Diagnostic Dilemma in Discriminating Between Spinal Neurenteric Cysts and Simple Arachnoid Cysts Based on Embryogenesis and Surgical Correlation

AU - Chiang, Liang Jui

AU - Wang, Chien Kuo

AU - Tsai, Hung Wen

AU - Lee, Jung Shun

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N2 - Background: Neurenteric cyst (NEC) is a rare intradural spinal tumor, but a correct preoperative diagnosis remains challenging. A misdiagnosis of arachnoid cyst (AC) often leads to conflicting surgical management and significantly higher recurrence. Case Description: We report the case of a 26-year-old woman who presented with progressive spastic quadriparesis with myelopathy below the C4 level, which was caused by a ventral intradural extramedullary cystic tumor at the C3-4 level. Magnetic resonance images showed the cystic content as identical to cerebrospinal fluid, which prompted the tentative diagnosis of spinal AC. Surgical fenestration was scheduled. However, intraoperative findings of a thick-walled cyst and severe adhesion to the neural structure without a history of trauma and inflammation were more compatible with the pathogenesis of an NEC. Because of the high recurrence rate after an incomplete resection of an NEC, we did a complete resection of the cyst with adhesive rootlets instead. Pathology analysis and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of an endodermal-derived NEC. Conclusions: NECs must be differentiated from ACs because they are different diseases and require different surgical management. In cases with clear cystic content, however, the diagnosis is likely to be AC, but a thick cystic wall and structural adhesions should suggest the differential diagnosis of NEC. Gross total removal of NECs should be attempted to reduce NEC recurrence.

AB - Background: Neurenteric cyst (NEC) is a rare intradural spinal tumor, but a correct preoperative diagnosis remains challenging. A misdiagnosis of arachnoid cyst (AC) often leads to conflicting surgical management and significantly higher recurrence. Case Description: We report the case of a 26-year-old woman who presented with progressive spastic quadriparesis with myelopathy below the C4 level, which was caused by a ventral intradural extramedullary cystic tumor at the C3-4 level. Magnetic resonance images showed the cystic content as identical to cerebrospinal fluid, which prompted the tentative diagnosis of spinal AC. Surgical fenestration was scheduled. However, intraoperative findings of a thick-walled cyst and severe adhesion to the neural structure without a history of trauma and inflammation were more compatible with the pathogenesis of an NEC. Because of the high recurrence rate after an incomplete resection of an NEC, we did a complete resection of the cyst with adhesive rootlets instead. Pathology analysis and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of an endodermal-derived NEC. Conclusions: NECs must be differentiated from ACs because they are different diseases and require different surgical management. In cases with clear cystic content, however, the diagnosis is likely to be AC, but a thick cystic wall and structural adhesions should suggest the differential diagnosis of NEC. Gross total removal of NECs should be attempted to reduce NEC recurrence.

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