Disability and walking capacity in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: Association with sensorimotor function, balance, and functional performance

Sang-I Lin, Ruey Mo Lin

研究成果: Article

29 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Study Design: One-group, prospective, cross-sectional study. Objectives: To determine how sensorimotor function, balance, and physical performance are associated with disability and walking capacity in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Background: Disability and limited walking capacity are often reported by patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Identification of associated factors could provide information for future investigations leading to better prevention and intervention strategies. Methods and Measures: Fifty patients with lumbar spinal stenosis answered questions regarding symptom intensity, disability, and walking capacity. Muscle strength and vibration sense were assessed to represent sensorimotor function. Balance ability was measured by single-leg stance time and basic physical performance was tested by the up-and-go (UG) test. Regression analyses, entering demographics and symptom intensity as control variables, and sensory, strength, balance, and physical performance as additional independent variables, were conducted separately for disability and walking capacity. Results: Symptom intensity, vibration sense at the big toe, and UG test time were significantly correlated with disability. The final regression model showed that the control variables explained 20% of the variance, while vibration sense and UG test time explained an additional 20% of the variance. Walking capacity was significantly correlated with vibration sense at the big toe and UG test time. No significant regression model emerged for walking capacity. Conclusions: A moderate amount of variance in disability could be explained by sensory function at the big toe and physical performance. These factors should be considered in future research.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)220-226
頁數7
期刊Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
35
發行號4
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2005 一月 1

指紋

Spinal Stenosis
Walking
Hallux
Vibration
Aptitude
Muscle Strength
Leg
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

引用此文

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abstract = "Study Design: One-group, prospective, cross-sectional study. Objectives: To determine how sensorimotor function, balance, and physical performance are associated with disability and walking capacity in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Background: Disability and limited walking capacity are often reported by patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Identification of associated factors could provide information for future investigations leading to better prevention and intervention strategies. Methods and Measures: Fifty patients with lumbar spinal stenosis answered questions regarding symptom intensity, disability, and walking capacity. Muscle strength and vibration sense were assessed to represent sensorimotor function. Balance ability was measured by single-leg stance time and basic physical performance was tested by the up-and-go (UG) test. Regression analyses, entering demographics and symptom intensity as control variables, and sensory, strength, balance, and physical performance as additional independent variables, were conducted separately for disability and walking capacity. Results: Symptom intensity, vibration sense at the big toe, and UG test time were significantly correlated with disability. The final regression model showed that the control variables explained 20{\%} of the variance, while vibration sense and UG test time explained an additional 20{\%} of the variance. Walking capacity was significantly correlated with vibration sense at the big toe and UG test time. No significant regression model emerged for walking capacity. Conclusions: A moderate amount of variance in disability could be explained by sensory function at the big toe and physical performance. These factors should be considered in future research.",
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