Enhanced removal of ethidium bromide (EtBr) from aqueous solution using rectorite

Zhaohui Li, Po Hsiang Chang, Wei Teh Jiang, Yujuan Liu

研究成果: Article

摘要

Ethidium bromide (EtBr) is an intercalating agent commonly used as nucleic acid fluorescent tag in various techniques of life science field. It is considered as a serious biohazard due to its mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. As such, developing high efficiency and low cost materials as cleanup kits is in urgent need although many methods have already been developed. In this study we take use of the affinity of organic cations for clay minerals of high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and large specific surface area (SSA) and tested the removal of EtBr using rectorite, a type of clay mineral made of 1:1 regularly mixed layers of illite and montmorillonite. Our results showed that the uptake of Et+ on rectorite could be as high as 400 mmol/kg and the removal of Et+ was extremely fast. Desorption of inorganic cation Ca2+ and sorption of counterion Br revealed that cation exchange was the dominating mechanism of Et+ removal using rectorite. Thermal analyses revealed that the EtBr could be thermally destructed inside the interlayer of rectorite and the material could be thermally regenerated. Thus, clay minerals could have a great potential to be fabricated into cleanup kits for the removal of EtBr in case of spill.

原文English
文章編號121254
期刊Journal of Hazardous Materials
384
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2020 二月 15

指紋

rectorite
Ethidium
Clay minerals
bromide
Cations
aqueous solution
Positive ions
Minerals
clay mineral
cleanup
Ion exchange
Biohazards
cation
Intercalating Agents
Bentonite
Hazardous Substances
life science
Biological Science Disciplines
mutagenicity
Nucleic acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

引用此文

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abstract = "Ethidium bromide (EtBr) is an intercalating agent commonly used as nucleic acid fluorescent tag in various techniques of life science field. It is considered as a serious biohazard due to its mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. As such, developing high efficiency and low cost materials as cleanup kits is in urgent need although many methods have already been developed. In this study we take use of the affinity of organic cations for clay minerals of high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and large specific surface area (SSA) and tested the removal of EtBr using rectorite, a type of clay mineral made of 1:1 regularly mixed layers of illite and montmorillonite. Our results showed that the uptake of Et+ on rectorite could be as high as 400 mmol/kg and the removal of Et+ was extremely fast. Desorption of inorganic cation Ca2+ and sorption of counterion Br− revealed that cation exchange was the dominating mechanism of Et+ removal using rectorite. Thermal analyses revealed that the EtBr could be thermally destructed inside the interlayer of rectorite and the material could be thermally regenerated. Thus, clay minerals could have a great potential to be fabricated into cleanup kits for the removal of EtBr in case of spill.",
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Enhanced removal of ethidium bromide (EtBr) from aqueous solution using rectorite. / Li, Zhaohui; Chang, Po Hsiang; Jiang, Wei Teh; Liu, Yujuan.

於: Journal of Hazardous Materials, 卷 384, 121254, 15.02.2020.

研究成果: Article

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AU - Liu, Yujuan

PY - 2020/2/15

Y1 - 2020/2/15

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