Group B streptococcal infections in children: the changing spectrum of infections in infants.

研究成果: Article

11 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

During a 9-year period from January 1988 to December 1996, 36 patients less than 18 years of age with Lancefield group B streptococcal infections were seen in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. Among 33 infants with invasive group B streptococcal infections, 3 (9%) were early onset disease (EOD), 27 (82%) late onset disease (LOD) and 3 (9%) onset beyond the third month of life. All cases of EOD were detected during the first day of life and 2 of them were premature births. In the infants with LOD, a high incidence of meningitis occurred (78%). The most common clinical presentation in group B streptococcal infections was fever (81%), followed by irritable crying (42%) and poor feeding (39%). Seizure was noted in 57% of meningitis cases. Obstetric and neonatal risk factors were compared between EOD and LOD, with prematurity and low birth weight significantly (P=0.01) more common among infants with EOD compared with LOD. Of the strains tested, the sensitivity to penicillin, ampicillin and erythromycin were 83%, 74%, and 75%, respectively. All strains were resistant to tetracycline and gentamicin. There were 2 case fatalities (6%) and 6 (17%) had major neurologic sequelae. These data provide that the vast majority of EOD are recognized on the first day of life and prematurity is an important risk factor. In comparison to the previous report in Taiwan, a changing spectrum of GBS infections in infants occurs during the study period. The observed incidence of EOD is decreased and meningitis is still predominantly in LOD. It is suggested early recognition and aggressive therapy have resulted in a much lower mortality rate than previously reported.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)107-112
頁數6
期刊Journal of microbiology, immunology, and infection = Wei mian yu gan ran za zhi
31
發行號2
出版狀態Published - 1998 一月 1

指紋

Streptococcal Infections
Meningitis
Infection
Crying
Incidence
Premature Birth
Low Birth Weight Infant
Erythromycin
Ampicillin
Gentamicins
Tetracycline
Taiwan
Penicillins
Nervous System
Obstetrics
Seizures
Fever
Late Onset Disorders
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

引用此文

@article{c3960c0abac14ac6bbc171e8e9c35e5f,
title = "Group B streptococcal infections in children: the changing spectrum of infections in infants.",
abstract = "During a 9-year period from January 1988 to December 1996, 36 patients less than 18 years of age with Lancefield group B streptococcal infections were seen in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. Among 33 infants with invasive group B streptococcal infections, 3 (9{\%}) were early onset disease (EOD), 27 (82{\%}) late onset disease (LOD) and 3 (9{\%}) onset beyond the third month of life. All cases of EOD were detected during the first day of life and 2 of them were premature births. In the infants with LOD, a high incidence of meningitis occurred (78{\%}). The most common clinical presentation in group B streptococcal infections was fever (81{\%}), followed by irritable crying (42{\%}) and poor feeding (39{\%}). Seizure was noted in 57{\%} of meningitis cases. Obstetric and neonatal risk factors were compared between EOD and LOD, with prematurity and low birth weight significantly (P=0.01) more common among infants with EOD compared with LOD. Of the strains tested, the sensitivity to penicillin, ampicillin and erythromycin were 83{\%}, 74{\%}, and 75{\%}, respectively. All strains were resistant to tetracycline and gentamicin. There were 2 case fatalities (6{\%}) and 6 (17{\%}) had major neurologic sequelae. These data provide that the vast majority of EOD are recognized on the first day of life and prematurity is an important risk factor. In comparison to the previous report in Taiwan, a changing spectrum of GBS infections in infants occurs during the study period. The observed incidence of EOD is decreased and meningitis is still predominantly in LOD. It is suggested early recognition and aggressive therapy have resulted in a much lower mortality rate than previously reported.",
author = "Yao-jong Yang and Ching-Chuan Liu and Shih-Min Wang",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "107--112",
journal = "Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection",
issn = "1684-1182",
publisher = "Elsevier Taiwan LLC",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Group B streptococcal infections in children

T2 - the changing spectrum of infections in infants.

AU - Yang, Yao-jong

AU - Liu, Ching-Chuan

AU - Wang, Shih-Min

PY - 1998/1/1

Y1 - 1998/1/1

N2 - During a 9-year period from January 1988 to December 1996, 36 patients less than 18 years of age with Lancefield group B streptococcal infections were seen in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. Among 33 infants with invasive group B streptococcal infections, 3 (9%) were early onset disease (EOD), 27 (82%) late onset disease (LOD) and 3 (9%) onset beyond the third month of life. All cases of EOD were detected during the first day of life and 2 of them were premature births. In the infants with LOD, a high incidence of meningitis occurred (78%). The most common clinical presentation in group B streptococcal infections was fever (81%), followed by irritable crying (42%) and poor feeding (39%). Seizure was noted in 57% of meningitis cases. Obstetric and neonatal risk factors were compared between EOD and LOD, with prematurity and low birth weight significantly (P=0.01) more common among infants with EOD compared with LOD. Of the strains tested, the sensitivity to penicillin, ampicillin and erythromycin were 83%, 74%, and 75%, respectively. All strains were resistant to tetracycline and gentamicin. There were 2 case fatalities (6%) and 6 (17%) had major neurologic sequelae. These data provide that the vast majority of EOD are recognized on the first day of life and prematurity is an important risk factor. In comparison to the previous report in Taiwan, a changing spectrum of GBS infections in infants occurs during the study period. The observed incidence of EOD is decreased and meningitis is still predominantly in LOD. It is suggested early recognition and aggressive therapy have resulted in a much lower mortality rate than previously reported.

AB - During a 9-year period from January 1988 to December 1996, 36 patients less than 18 years of age with Lancefield group B streptococcal infections were seen in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. Among 33 infants with invasive group B streptococcal infections, 3 (9%) were early onset disease (EOD), 27 (82%) late onset disease (LOD) and 3 (9%) onset beyond the third month of life. All cases of EOD were detected during the first day of life and 2 of them were premature births. In the infants with LOD, a high incidence of meningitis occurred (78%). The most common clinical presentation in group B streptococcal infections was fever (81%), followed by irritable crying (42%) and poor feeding (39%). Seizure was noted in 57% of meningitis cases. Obstetric and neonatal risk factors were compared between EOD and LOD, with prematurity and low birth weight significantly (P=0.01) more common among infants with EOD compared with LOD. Of the strains tested, the sensitivity to penicillin, ampicillin and erythromycin were 83%, 74%, and 75%, respectively. All strains were resistant to tetracycline and gentamicin. There were 2 case fatalities (6%) and 6 (17%) had major neurologic sequelae. These data provide that the vast majority of EOD are recognized on the first day of life and prematurity is an important risk factor. In comparison to the previous report in Taiwan, a changing spectrum of GBS infections in infants occurs during the study period. The observed incidence of EOD is decreased and meningitis is still predominantly in LOD. It is suggested early recognition and aggressive therapy have resulted in a much lower mortality rate than previously reported.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032082606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032082606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10596988

AN - SCOPUS:0032082606

VL - 31

SP - 107

EP - 112

JO - Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection

JF - Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection

SN - 1684-1182

IS - 2

ER -