Human papilloma virus detection in neoplastic and non-neoplastic nasopharyngeal tissues in Taiwan

Cheng-Chih Huang, Jenn-Ren Hsiao, Ming-Wei Yang, Yuan-Hua Wu, Keng-Fu Hsu, Yao Chang, Chaio Wei Chen, Sen-Tien Tsai, Hsuan Pei Wei, Ying Tai Jin

研究成果: Article

13 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of certain head and neck cancers. Whether it also has a role in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Taiwan is unclear. Methods: Detection and genotyping of HPVs were performed in 43 primary NPCs (one WHO-I and 42 WHO-II/III) and 40 nasopharyngeal controls using PCR-based HPV genotyping arrays. Localisation of high-risk HPV and Epstein-Barr virus genomes was performed in another 46 primary NPCs (five WHO-I and 41 WHO-II/III) and seven paired metastatic WHO-II/III NPCs using in situ hybridisation. Results: In the HPV genotyping cohort, oncogenic HPVs were detected equally in WHO-II/III NPCs (31%, 13/42) and nasopharyngeal controls (35%, 14/40). Tumour high-risk HPV status did not correlate with the prognosis of patients with NPC. In the high-risk HPV in situ hybridisation cohort, 14 (88%) of the 16 oncogenic HPV-positive WHO-II/III NPCs showed a unique cytoplasmic/perinuclear staining pattern, which is distinct from the typical dot/punctate nuclear staining pattern indicating HPV genome integration. In addition, oncogenic HPVs were not always retained in NPC cells during the process of metastasis. Conclusions: This study does not support an association between oncogenic HPV and the carcinogenesis or prognosis of WHO-II/III NPCs in Taiwan.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)571-577
頁數7
期刊Journal of Clinical Pathology
64
發行號7
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2011 七月 1

指紋

Papillomaviridae
Taiwan
Oncogenic Viruses
In Situ Hybridization
Carcinogenesis
Genome
Staining and Labeling
Virus Integration
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Human Herpesvirus 4

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

引用此文

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title = "Human papilloma virus detection in neoplastic and non-neoplastic nasopharyngeal tissues in Taiwan",
abstract = "Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of certain head and neck cancers. Whether it also has a role in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Taiwan is unclear. Methods: Detection and genotyping of HPVs were performed in 43 primary NPCs (one WHO-I and 42 WHO-II/III) and 40 nasopharyngeal controls using PCR-based HPV genotyping arrays. Localisation of high-risk HPV and Epstein-Barr virus genomes was performed in another 46 primary NPCs (five WHO-I and 41 WHO-II/III) and seven paired metastatic WHO-II/III NPCs using in situ hybridisation. Results: In the HPV genotyping cohort, oncogenic HPVs were detected equally in WHO-II/III NPCs (31{\%}, 13/42) and nasopharyngeal controls (35{\%}, 14/40). Tumour high-risk HPV status did not correlate with the prognosis of patients with NPC. In the high-risk HPV in situ hybridisation cohort, 14 (88{\%}) of the 16 oncogenic HPV-positive WHO-II/III NPCs showed a unique cytoplasmic/perinuclear staining pattern, which is distinct from the typical dot/punctate nuclear staining pattern indicating HPV genome integration. In addition, oncogenic HPVs were not always retained in NPC cells during the process of metastasis. Conclusions: This study does not support an association between oncogenic HPV and the carcinogenesis or prognosis of WHO-II/III NPCs in Taiwan.",
author = "Cheng-Chih Huang and Jenn-Ren Hsiao and Ming-Wei Yang and Yuan-Hua Wu and Keng-Fu Hsu and Yao Chang and Chen, {Chaio Wei} and Sen-Tien Tsai and Wei, {Hsuan Pei} and Jin, {Ying Tai}",
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T1 - Human papilloma virus detection in neoplastic and non-neoplastic nasopharyngeal tissues in Taiwan

AU - Huang, Cheng-Chih

AU - Hsiao, Jenn-Ren

AU - Yang, Ming-Wei

AU - Wu, Yuan-Hua

AU - Hsu, Keng-Fu

AU - Chang, Yao

AU - Chen, Chaio Wei

AU - Tsai, Sen-Tien

AU - Wei, Hsuan Pei

AU - Jin, Ying Tai

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of certain head and neck cancers. Whether it also has a role in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Taiwan is unclear. Methods: Detection and genotyping of HPVs were performed in 43 primary NPCs (one WHO-I and 42 WHO-II/III) and 40 nasopharyngeal controls using PCR-based HPV genotyping arrays. Localisation of high-risk HPV and Epstein-Barr virus genomes was performed in another 46 primary NPCs (five WHO-I and 41 WHO-II/III) and seven paired metastatic WHO-II/III NPCs using in situ hybridisation. Results: In the HPV genotyping cohort, oncogenic HPVs were detected equally in WHO-II/III NPCs (31%, 13/42) and nasopharyngeal controls (35%, 14/40). Tumour high-risk HPV status did not correlate with the prognosis of patients with NPC. In the high-risk HPV in situ hybridisation cohort, 14 (88%) of the 16 oncogenic HPV-positive WHO-II/III NPCs showed a unique cytoplasmic/perinuclear staining pattern, which is distinct from the typical dot/punctate nuclear staining pattern indicating HPV genome integration. In addition, oncogenic HPVs were not always retained in NPC cells during the process of metastasis. Conclusions: This study does not support an association between oncogenic HPV and the carcinogenesis or prognosis of WHO-II/III NPCs in Taiwan.

AB - Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of certain head and neck cancers. Whether it also has a role in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Taiwan is unclear. Methods: Detection and genotyping of HPVs were performed in 43 primary NPCs (one WHO-I and 42 WHO-II/III) and 40 nasopharyngeal controls using PCR-based HPV genotyping arrays. Localisation of high-risk HPV and Epstein-Barr virus genomes was performed in another 46 primary NPCs (five WHO-I and 41 WHO-II/III) and seven paired metastatic WHO-II/III NPCs using in situ hybridisation. Results: In the HPV genotyping cohort, oncogenic HPVs were detected equally in WHO-II/III NPCs (31%, 13/42) and nasopharyngeal controls (35%, 14/40). Tumour high-risk HPV status did not correlate with the prognosis of patients with NPC. In the high-risk HPV in situ hybridisation cohort, 14 (88%) of the 16 oncogenic HPV-positive WHO-II/III NPCs showed a unique cytoplasmic/perinuclear staining pattern, which is distinct from the typical dot/punctate nuclear staining pattern indicating HPV genome integration. In addition, oncogenic HPVs were not always retained in NPC cells during the process of metastasis. Conclusions: This study does not support an association between oncogenic HPV and the carcinogenesis or prognosis of WHO-II/III NPCs in Taiwan.

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