Impact of new technologies for middle-aged and older patients: In-depth interviews with type 2 diabetes patients using continuous glucose monitoring

Ching-Ju Chiu, Yu Hsuan Chou, Yen Ju Chen, Ye-Fong Du

研究成果: Article

摘要

Background: Technology-embedded health care is a future trend. How middle-aged and older patients perceive the added technology intervention is not clear. Objective: The study aimed to understand the factors associated with the adoption of new technology in diabetes care, to understand the feelings and behaviors while using it, and to determine the changes in attitudes and behavior after completing the use of the new technology at the 3-month follow-up. Methods: Middle-aged and older type 2 diabetes patients who had received professional continuous glucose monitoring (CGM; iPro 2 [Medtronic]) were invited for semistructured in-depth interviews on the day of the CGM sensor removal and at 3 months after CGM-based counseling. A phenomenography approach was used to analyze the interview data. Results: A total of 20 type 2 diabetes patients (aged 53 to 72 years, 13 males and 7 females, 4 to 40 years duration of diabetes, mean glycated hemoglobin 8.54% [SD 0.71%]) completed 2 sections of semistructured in-depth interviews. Physician guidance and participant motivation toward problem solving were found to be factors associated with adoption of the device. Participants indicated that technology can be a reminder, a supervisor, and a visualizer of blood glucose, all of which are helpful for disease management. However, CGM is somewhat inconvenient, and some participants also reported that the provision of this new technology might be a hint of disease progression. There was a higher percentage of women compared with men who reported that CGM can be a reminder or a supervisor to help them with diet control. Conclusions: Physician guidance and participants’ degree of motivation are keys to adopting new technology in the case of middle-aged and older adults. Although the CGM sensor may cause inconvenience to patients on their limited body movement when wearing the device, it is helpful for diet control and is an effective behavioral modification tool that offers support, especially in the case of women.

原文English
文章編號e10992
期刊Journal of medical Internet research
21
發行號2
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2019 二月 1

指紋

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Interviews
Technology
Glucose
Motivation
Diet
Physicians
Equipment and Supplies
Biomedical Technology
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Disease Management
Disease Progression
Blood Glucose
Counseling
Emotions
Learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics

引用此文

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title = "Impact of new technologies for middle-aged and older patients: In-depth interviews with type 2 diabetes patients using continuous glucose monitoring",
abstract = "Background: Technology-embedded health care is a future trend. How middle-aged and older patients perceive the added technology intervention is not clear. Objective: The study aimed to understand the factors associated with the adoption of new technology in diabetes care, to understand the feelings and behaviors while using it, and to determine the changes in attitudes and behavior after completing the use of the new technology at the 3-month follow-up. Methods: Middle-aged and older type 2 diabetes patients who had received professional continuous glucose monitoring (CGM; iPro 2 [Medtronic]) were invited for semistructured in-depth interviews on the day of the CGM sensor removal and at 3 months after CGM-based counseling. A phenomenography approach was used to analyze the interview data. Results: A total of 20 type 2 diabetes patients (aged 53 to 72 years, 13 males and 7 females, 4 to 40 years duration of diabetes, mean glycated hemoglobin 8.54{\%} [SD 0.71{\%}]) completed 2 sections of semistructured in-depth interviews. Physician guidance and participant motivation toward problem solving were found to be factors associated with adoption of the device. Participants indicated that technology can be a reminder, a supervisor, and a visualizer of blood glucose, all of which are helpful for disease management. However, CGM is somewhat inconvenient, and some participants also reported that the provision of this new technology might be a hint of disease progression. There was a higher percentage of women compared with men who reported that CGM can be a reminder or a supervisor to help them with diet control. Conclusions: Physician guidance and participants’ degree of motivation are keys to adopting new technology in the case of middle-aged and older adults. Although the CGM sensor may cause inconvenience to patients on their limited body movement when wearing the device, it is helpful for diet control and is an effective behavioral modification tool that offers support, especially in the case of women.",
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