In Vivo Visualization of Brain Vasculature in Alzheimer's Disease Mice by High-Frequency Micro-Doppler Imaging

Hsin Che Li, Pei Yu Chen, Hsiang Fan Cheng, Yu Min Kuo, Chih Chung Huang

研究成果: Article

摘要

Cerebrovascular disorders are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Functional analysis of the cerebral vasculature requires an in vivo approach to visualize the blood flow in small animal brains. This paper proposes a high-frequency micro-Doppler imaging (HFμDI) technology for mapping mouse cerebral vasculature. Methods: HFμDI used a 40-MHz transducer with an ultrafast ultrasound imaging technology that enabled in vivo visualization of the mouse brain up to 3 mm in depth; furthermore, a minimal vessel diameter of 48 μm could be determined. Results: Animal experiments determined that the cortical and hippocampal vessel density in young wild-type (WT) mice was similar to that in middle-aged WT mice. However, compared with the vessel density in middle-aged WT mice, that in middle-aged mice with AD was significantly lower, particularly in the hippocampus. Discussion: In vivo observation of cerebral vasculature demonstrated the effectiveness of HFμDI for the preclinical study of AD, and a potential way for human diagnosis was provided.

原文English
文章編號8666731
頁(從 - 到)3393-3401
頁數9
期刊IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering
66
發行號12
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2019 十二月

指紋

Brain
Visualization
Imaging techniques
Animals
Functional analysis
Transducers
Blood
Ultrasonics
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering

引用此文

@article{bb8a407c4ba84f3fae5f798fa783632b,
title = "In Vivo Visualization of Brain Vasculature in Alzheimer's Disease Mice by High-Frequency Micro-Doppler Imaging",
abstract = "Cerebrovascular disorders are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Functional analysis of the cerebral vasculature requires an in vivo approach to visualize the blood flow in small animal brains. This paper proposes a high-frequency micro-Doppler imaging (HFμDI) technology for mapping mouse cerebral vasculature. Methods: HFμDI used a 40-MHz transducer with an ultrafast ultrasound imaging technology that enabled in vivo visualization of the mouse brain up to 3 mm in depth; furthermore, a minimal vessel diameter of 48 μm could be determined. Results: Animal experiments determined that the cortical and hippocampal vessel density in young wild-type (WT) mice was similar to that in middle-aged WT mice. However, compared with the vessel density in middle-aged WT mice, that in middle-aged mice with AD was significantly lower, particularly in the hippocampus. Discussion: In vivo observation of cerebral vasculature demonstrated the effectiveness of HFμDI for the preclinical study of AD, and a potential way for human diagnosis was provided.",
author = "Li, {Hsin Che} and Chen, {Pei Yu} and Cheng, {Hsiang Fan} and Kuo, {Yu Min} and Huang, {Chih Chung}",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1109/TBME.2019.2904702",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "3393--3401",
journal = "IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering",
issn = "0018-9294",
publisher = "IEEE Computer Society",
number = "12",

}

In Vivo Visualization of Brain Vasculature in Alzheimer's Disease Mice by High-Frequency Micro-Doppler Imaging. / Li, Hsin Che; Chen, Pei Yu; Cheng, Hsiang Fan; Kuo, Yu Min; Huang, Chih Chung.

於: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 卷 66, 編號 12, 8666731, 12.2019, p. 3393-3401.

研究成果: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - In Vivo Visualization of Brain Vasculature in Alzheimer's Disease Mice by High-Frequency Micro-Doppler Imaging

AU - Li, Hsin Che

AU - Chen, Pei Yu

AU - Cheng, Hsiang Fan

AU - Kuo, Yu Min

AU - Huang, Chih Chung

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - Cerebrovascular disorders are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Functional analysis of the cerebral vasculature requires an in vivo approach to visualize the blood flow in small animal brains. This paper proposes a high-frequency micro-Doppler imaging (HFμDI) technology for mapping mouse cerebral vasculature. Methods: HFμDI used a 40-MHz transducer with an ultrafast ultrasound imaging technology that enabled in vivo visualization of the mouse brain up to 3 mm in depth; furthermore, a minimal vessel diameter of 48 μm could be determined. Results: Animal experiments determined that the cortical and hippocampal vessel density in young wild-type (WT) mice was similar to that in middle-aged WT mice. However, compared with the vessel density in middle-aged WT mice, that in middle-aged mice with AD was significantly lower, particularly in the hippocampus. Discussion: In vivo observation of cerebral vasculature demonstrated the effectiveness of HFμDI for the preclinical study of AD, and a potential way for human diagnosis was provided.

AB - Cerebrovascular disorders are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Functional analysis of the cerebral vasculature requires an in vivo approach to visualize the blood flow in small animal brains. This paper proposes a high-frequency micro-Doppler imaging (HFμDI) technology for mapping mouse cerebral vasculature. Methods: HFμDI used a 40-MHz transducer with an ultrafast ultrasound imaging technology that enabled in vivo visualization of the mouse brain up to 3 mm in depth; furthermore, a minimal vessel diameter of 48 μm could be determined. Results: Animal experiments determined that the cortical and hippocampal vessel density in young wild-type (WT) mice was similar to that in middle-aged WT mice. However, compared with the vessel density in middle-aged WT mice, that in middle-aged mice with AD was significantly lower, particularly in the hippocampus. Discussion: In vivo observation of cerebral vasculature demonstrated the effectiveness of HFμDI for the preclinical study of AD, and a potential way for human diagnosis was provided.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85075805297&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85075805297&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/TBME.2019.2904702

DO - 10.1109/TBME.2019.2904702

M3 - Article

C2 - 30872220

AN - SCOPUS:85075805297

VL - 66

SP - 3393

EP - 3401

JO - IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering

JF - IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering

SN - 0018-9294

IS - 12

M1 - 8666731

ER -