Investigating the Association between Alcohol and Risk of Head and Neck Cancer in Taiwan

Cheng Chih Huang, Jenn Ren Hsiao, Wei Ting Lee, Yao Chou Lee, Chun Yen Ou, Chan Chi Chang, Yu Cheng Lu, Jehn Shyun Huang, Tung Yiu Wong, Ken Chung Chen, Sen Tien Tsai, Sheen Yie Fang, Jiunn Liang Wu, Yuan Hua Wu, Wei Ting Hsueh, Chia Jui Yen, Shang Yin Wu, Jang Yang Chang, Chen Lin Lin, Yi Hui WangYa Ling Weng, Han Chien Yang, Yu Shan Chen, Jeffrey S. Chang

研究成果: Article

12 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Although alcohol is an established risk factor of head and neck cancer (HNC), insufficiencies exist in the literature in several aspects. We analyzed detailed alcohol consumption data (amount and type of alcoholic beverage) of 811 HNC patients and 940 controls to evaluate the association between alcohol and HNC by HNC sites and by genotypes of ADH1B and ALDH2. Alcohol was associated with an increased HNC risk in a dose-response relationship, with the highest risk observed for hypopharyngeal cancer, followed by oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancers. Liquor showed a stronger positive association with HNC than beer and wine. The highest HNC risk occurred in individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. In our study population, 21.8% of HNCs, 55.7% of oropharyngeal cancers, and 89.1% of hypopharyngeal cancers could be attributed to alcohol. Alcohol accounted for 47.3% of HNCs among individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. The HNC risk associated with alcohol became comparable to that of never/occasional drinkers after ten or more years of cessation from regular alcohol drinking. In conclusion, alcohol use is associated with an increased HNC risk, particularly for individuals with slow ethanol metabolism. HNC incidence may be reduced by alcohol cessation.

原文English
文章編號9701
期刊Scientific reports
7
發行號1
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2017 十二月 1

指紋

Head and Neck Neoplasms
Taiwan
Alcohols
Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms
Genotype
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages
Laryngeal Neoplasms
Wine
Ethanol

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

引用此文

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title = "Investigating the Association between Alcohol and Risk of Head and Neck Cancer in Taiwan",
abstract = "Although alcohol is an established risk factor of head and neck cancer (HNC), insufficiencies exist in the literature in several aspects. We analyzed detailed alcohol consumption data (amount and type of alcoholic beverage) of 811 HNC patients and 940 controls to evaluate the association between alcohol and HNC by HNC sites and by genotypes of ADH1B and ALDH2. Alcohol was associated with an increased HNC risk in a dose-response relationship, with the highest risk observed for hypopharyngeal cancer, followed by oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancers. Liquor showed a stronger positive association with HNC than beer and wine. The highest HNC risk occurred in individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. In our study population, 21.8{\%} of HNCs, 55.7{\%} of oropharyngeal cancers, and 89.1{\%} of hypopharyngeal cancers could be attributed to alcohol. Alcohol accounted for 47.3{\%} of HNCs among individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. The HNC risk associated with alcohol became comparable to that of never/occasional drinkers after ten or more years of cessation from regular alcohol drinking. In conclusion, alcohol use is associated with an increased HNC risk, particularly for individuals with slow ethanol metabolism. HNC incidence may be reduced by alcohol cessation.",
author = "Huang, {Cheng Chih} and Hsiao, {Jenn Ren} and Lee, {Wei Ting} and Lee, {Yao Chou} and Ou, {Chun Yen} and Chang, {Chan Chi} and Lu, {Yu Cheng} and Huang, {Jehn Shyun} and Wong, {Tung Yiu} and Chen, {Ken Chung} and Tsai, {Sen Tien} and Fang, {Sheen Yie} and Wu, {Jiunn Liang} and Wu, {Yuan Hua} and Hsueh, {Wei Ting} and Yen, {Chia Jui} and Wu, {Shang Yin} and Chang, {Jang Yang} and Lin, {Chen Lin} and Wang, {Yi Hui} and Weng, {Ya Ling} and Yang, {Han Chien} and Chen, {Yu Shan} and Chang, {Jeffrey S.}",
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T1 - Investigating the Association between Alcohol and Risk of Head and Neck Cancer in Taiwan

AU - Huang, Cheng Chih

AU - Hsiao, Jenn Ren

AU - Lee, Wei Ting

AU - Lee, Yao Chou

AU - Ou, Chun Yen

AU - Chang, Chan Chi

AU - Lu, Yu Cheng

AU - Huang, Jehn Shyun

AU - Wong, Tung Yiu

AU - Chen, Ken Chung

AU - Tsai, Sen Tien

AU - Fang, Sheen Yie

AU - Wu, Jiunn Liang

AU - Wu, Yuan Hua

AU - Hsueh, Wei Ting

AU - Yen, Chia Jui

AU - Wu, Shang Yin

AU - Chang, Jang Yang

AU - Lin, Chen Lin

AU - Wang, Yi Hui

AU - Weng, Ya Ling

AU - Yang, Han Chien

AU - Chen, Yu Shan

AU - Chang, Jeffrey S.

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Although alcohol is an established risk factor of head and neck cancer (HNC), insufficiencies exist in the literature in several aspects. We analyzed detailed alcohol consumption data (amount and type of alcoholic beverage) of 811 HNC patients and 940 controls to evaluate the association between alcohol and HNC by HNC sites and by genotypes of ADH1B and ALDH2. Alcohol was associated with an increased HNC risk in a dose-response relationship, with the highest risk observed for hypopharyngeal cancer, followed by oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancers. Liquor showed a stronger positive association with HNC than beer and wine. The highest HNC risk occurred in individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. In our study population, 21.8% of HNCs, 55.7% of oropharyngeal cancers, and 89.1% of hypopharyngeal cancers could be attributed to alcohol. Alcohol accounted for 47.3% of HNCs among individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. The HNC risk associated with alcohol became comparable to that of never/occasional drinkers after ten or more years of cessation from regular alcohol drinking. In conclusion, alcohol use is associated with an increased HNC risk, particularly for individuals with slow ethanol metabolism. HNC incidence may be reduced by alcohol cessation.

AB - Although alcohol is an established risk factor of head and neck cancer (HNC), insufficiencies exist in the literature in several aspects. We analyzed detailed alcohol consumption data (amount and type of alcoholic beverage) of 811 HNC patients and 940 controls to evaluate the association between alcohol and HNC by HNC sites and by genotypes of ADH1B and ALDH2. Alcohol was associated with an increased HNC risk in a dose-response relationship, with the highest risk observed for hypopharyngeal cancer, followed by oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancers. Liquor showed a stronger positive association with HNC than beer and wine. The highest HNC risk occurred in individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. In our study population, 21.8% of HNCs, 55.7% of oropharyngeal cancers, and 89.1% of hypopharyngeal cancers could be attributed to alcohol. Alcohol accounted for 47.3% of HNCs among individuals with the slow ADH1B and slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotype combination. The HNC risk associated with alcohol became comparable to that of never/occasional drinkers after ten or more years of cessation from regular alcohol drinking. In conclusion, alcohol use is associated with an increased HNC risk, particularly for individuals with slow ethanol metabolism. HNC incidence may be reduced by alcohol cessation.

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