Plane-to-plane analysis of mandibular misalignment in patients with facial asymmetry

Dung-Yau Wang, Jia-Kuang Liu, Tung Chin Wu, Yi-Hsuan Tu, Ken-Chung Chen, Jing-Jing Fang, Ko-Hsin Cheng, Jing-Wei Lee

研究成果: Article

3 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Introduction Little is known regarding how the mandible rotates in facial asymmetry. The purpose of this study was to study mandibular misalignment with a new plane-to-plane analysis method in patients with facial asymmetry. Methods Optimal symmetry planes (OSPs) were generated by computing the greatest count of paired voxels on opposing sides of the computerized tomography image of the structure. The mandibular OSP was measured against the midfacial OSP for its alignment. The deviation angle formed by the 2 OSPs was broken down into a y-axis component (frontal deviation angle) and a z-axis component (horizontal deviation angle). Fifty-nine patients who sought correction for facial asymmetry were included for study. Results The new analysis method was feasible. Fifty patients (83%) had significant mandibular misalignment (deviation, ≥4° or 4 mm). The locations of the rotational axes exhibited significant variations that could explain the varied features of the asymmetry. The frontal deviation angle (mean, 3.80° ± 3.89°) was significantly larger than the horizontal deviation angle (mean, 2.77° ± 1.71°). There was no significant correlation between the horizontal deviation angle and the anterior deviation distance or the posterior deviation distance. Conclusions Proper mandibular realignment was suggested to be the primary aim in surgical correction of most jawbone asymmetries. Because of the greatly varied rotational axes and the obscure z-axis rotation, realignment could be difficult with the traditional approach. The OSP-based analysis is advocated to guide planning.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)70-80
頁數11
期刊American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
153
發行號1
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2018 一月 1

指紋

Facial Asymmetry
Mandible
Tomography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

引用此文

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abstract = "Introduction Little is known regarding how the mandible rotates in facial asymmetry. The purpose of this study was to study mandibular misalignment with a new plane-to-plane analysis method in patients with facial asymmetry. Methods Optimal symmetry planes (OSPs) were generated by computing the greatest count of paired voxels on opposing sides of the computerized tomography image of the structure. The mandibular OSP was measured against the midfacial OSP for its alignment. The deviation angle formed by the 2 OSPs was broken down into a y-axis component (frontal deviation angle) and a z-axis component (horizontal deviation angle). Fifty-nine patients who sought correction for facial asymmetry were included for study. Results The new analysis method was feasible. Fifty patients (83{\%}) had significant mandibular misalignment (deviation, ≥4° or 4 mm). The locations of the rotational axes exhibited significant variations that could explain the varied features of the asymmetry. The frontal deviation angle (mean, 3.80° ± 3.89°) was significantly larger than the horizontal deviation angle (mean, 2.77° ± 1.71°). There was no significant correlation between the horizontal deviation angle and the anterior deviation distance or the posterior deviation distance. Conclusions Proper mandibular realignment was suggested to be the primary aim in surgical correction of most jawbone asymmetries. Because of the greatly varied rotational axes and the obscure z-axis rotation, realignment could be difficult with the traditional approach. The OSP-based analysis is advocated to guide planning.",
author = "Dung-Yau Wang and Jia-Kuang Liu and Wu, {Tung Chin} and Yi-Hsuan Tu and Ken-Chung Chen and Jing-Jing Fang and Ko-Hsin Cheng and Jing-Wei Lee",
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AU - Liu, Jia-Kuang

AU - Wu, Tung Chin

AU - Tu, Yi-Hsuan

AU - Chen, Ken-Chung

AU - Fang, Jing-Jing

AU - Cheng, Ko-Hsin

AU - Lee, Jing-Wei

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N2 - Introduction Little is known regarding how the mandible rotates in facial asymmetry. The purpose of this study was to study mandibular misalignment with a new plane-to-plane analysis method in patients with facial asymmetry. Methods Optimal symmetry planes (OSPs) were generated by computing the greatest count of paired voxels on opposing sides of the computerized tomography image of the structure. The mandibular OSP was measured against the midfacial OSP for its alignment. The deviation angle formed by the 2 OSPs was broken down into a y-axis component (frontal deviation angle) and a z-axis component (horizontal deviation angle). Fifty-nine patients who sought correction for facial asymmetry were included for study. Results The new analysis method was feasible. Fifty patients (83%) had significant mandibular misalignment (deviation, ≥4° or 4 mm). The locations of the rotational axes exhibited significant variations that could explain the varied features of the asymmetry. The frontal deviation angle (mean, 3.80° ± 3.89°) was significantly larger than the horizontal deviation angle (mean, 2.77° ± 1.71°). There was no significant correlation between the horizontal deviation angle and the anterior deviation distance or the posterior deviation distance. Conclusions Proper mandibular realignment was suggested to be the primary aim in surgical correction of most jawbone asymmetries. Because of the greatly varied rotational axes and the obscure z-axis rotation, realignment could be difficult with the traditional approach. The OSP-based analysis is advocated to guide planning.

AB - Introduction Little is known regarding how the mandible rotates in facial asymmetry. The purpose of this study was to study mandibular misalignment with a new plane-to-plane analysis method in patients with facial asymmetry. Methods Optimal symmetry planes (OSPs) were generated by computing the greatest count of paired voxels on opposing sides of the computerized tomography image of the structure. The mandibular OSP was measured against the midfacial OSP for its alignment. The deviation angle formed by the 2 OSPs was broken down into a y-axis component (frontal deviation angle) and a z-axis component (horizontal deviation angle). Fifty-nine patients who sought correction for facial asymmetry were included for study. Results The new analysis method was feasible. Fifty patients (83%) had significant mandibular misalignment (deviation, ≥4° or 4 mm). The locations of the rotational axes exhibited significant variations that could explain the varied features of the asymmetry. The frontal deviation angle (mean, 3.80° ± 3.89°) was significantly larger than the horizontal deviation angle (mean, 2.77° ± 1.71°). There was no significant correlation between the horizontal deviation angle and the anterior deviation distance or the posterior deviation distance. Conclusions Proper mandibular realignment was suggested to be the primary aim in surgical correction of most jawbone asymmetries. Because of the greatly varied rotational axes and the obscure z-axis rotation, realignment could be difficult with the traditional approach. The OSP-based analysis is advocated to guide planning.

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